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Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 14

Wireless power is close, 40 smartphones powered simultaneously at 5m

Wireless power is something I simply can't live without, but I can only charge one or two devices at once. But, over in Daejeon, Republic of Korea, scientists have used something they call the Dipole Coil Resonant System to charge 40 smartphones simultaneously, even if the power source is up to 5m away.

 

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We already know about MIT's Coupled Magnetic Resonance System (CMRS) which was unveiled in 2007, which used a magnetic field in order to charge devices - but it had an envelope of 2.1m. CMRS had some major technical limitations for commercialization, most of which haven't been solved: "a rather complicated coil structure (composed of four coils for input, transmission, reception, and load); bulky-size resonant coils; high frequency (in a range of 10 MHz) required to resonate the transmitter and receiver coils, which results in low transfer efficiency; and a high Q factor of 2,000 that makes the resonant coils very sensitive to surroundings such as temperature, humidity, and human proximity".

 

Chun T. Rim, a Professor of Nuclear & Quantum Engineering at KAIST, along with his team, developed the "Dipole Coil Resonant System" or DCRS. This system is for an extended range of inductive power transfer, at up to 5 meters between transmitter and receiver coils. Professor Rim's solution to CMRS' problems are all but solved with DCRS.

 

The technology is capable of powering "a large LED TV as well as three 40 W-fans can be powered from a 5-meter distance" according to to Professor Rim. He continues: "Our technology proved the possibility of a new remote power delivery mechanism that has never been tried at such a long distance. Although the long-range wireless power transfer is still in an early stage of commercialization and quite costly to implement, we believe that this is the right direction for electric power to be supplied in the future. Just like we see Wi-Fi zones everywhere today, we will eventually have many Wi-Power zones at such places as restaurants and streets that provide electric power wirelessly to electronic devices. We will use all the devices anywhere without tangled wires attached and anytime without worrying about charging their batteries".

Artificial blood production on an industrial scale isn't far away

In something that feels like it's right out of HBO's 'True Blood,' we're looking at a future of artificial blood, mass manufactured on an industrial scale - in the near future.

 

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Wellcome Trust is behind the research, with scientists working on getting to the point of reaching a trial stage of using artificial blood made from human stem cells. Principal researcher, Marc Turner, has said that his team has made red blood cells that are capable of being used in a clinical transfusion. Professor Turner has talked of a technique to culture red blood cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells - cells that have been taken from humans, and 'rewound' into stem cells.

 

From there, biochemical conditions that are similar to what happens inside of the human body are recreated to induce the iPS cells to mature into red blood cells - best of all, in the universal blood type O. Prof Turner explains: "Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being".

Continue reading 'Artificial blood production on an industrial scale isn't far away' (full post)

Laser communication system heads to ISS for testing this month

Later this month a SpaceX cargo ship will take off and head towards the ISS to restock the orbiting platform with food and other gear. Among the other gear that will be aboard the spacecraft is the NASA Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science platform also known as OPALS.

 

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OPALS is a laser system that is intended to significantly increase the speed of communications between the Earth and the ISS. The system is said to be an upgrade for the ISS sort of like replacing your dial-up internet connection at home with DSL. Basically, this laser is giving the ISS broadband.

Continue reading 'Laser communication system heads to ISS for testing this month' (full post)

NASA requests help for new battery technology in its spacecraft

Batteries feel like one of the least upgraded devices, but are featured in virtually all electronic devices. NASA, as advanced as the US space agency may be, needs some help designing and making new batteries for its travels into the dark beyond.

 

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NASA is now asking public institutions and companies to submit their proposals for battery alternatives, where it will want to see a new low-level energy cell design. This will include chemistry and packaging, as well as advanced devices that would really outperform the current lithium cell-based batteries.

 

The US space agency will hand out cash awards to the four most promising candidates, from the first phase of its selection process. NASA might not even find the new power source it is looking for, and if that's the case, maybe it should look at working with Tesla, failing that - Tony Stark?

North Korea names its space program 'NADA,' but this isn't April Fools

North Korea and its shiny new space program have an updated logo, which seems heavily influenced from the NASA logo, along with a rather amusing new acronym.

 

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The National Aerospace Development Administration (NADA), whose acronym spells out the Spanish word for "nothing," will not be used for weapons development, North Korea claims.

 

"The National Aerospace Development Administration is the country's central guidance institution organize all the space development projects," the country said in a press release. "Its mission is to put into practice the idea and principle of the DPRK government to develop the space [sic] for peaceful purpose."

Continue reading 'North Korea names its space program 'NADA,' but this isn't April Fools' (full post)

NASA suspends ties with Russian space program, except at space station

The US space agency NASA plans to temporarily suspend space-related ties with Russia, except for the multi-national International Space Station (ISS), as both sides continue to fight for political bargaining chips.

 

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Following the retirement of NASA's space shuttle fleet, the US space agency has relied on Russia to ferry astronauts and supplies into space - and back to Earth again - much to the growing dismay of US lawmakers. The US will still meet with Russia when other partnering space programs are present, as both nations have invested a tremendous amount into the ISS, and will keep the orbiting space station operational and safe.

 

"This suspension includes NASA travel to Russia and visits by Russian Government representatives to NASA facilities, bilateral meetings, email, and teleconferences or video conferences," said Michael O'Brien, NASA associate administrator for international and interagency relations, during a public notice.

Continue reading 'NASA suspends ties with Russian space program, except at space station' (full post)

US Navy testing seafaring robotic firefighters for use on ships

The U.S. Navy's Office of Naval Research (ONR) hopes its Shipboard Autonomous Firefighting Robot (SAFFiR) will exceed expectations, a program developed by Virginia Tech, University of Pennsylvania, and University of California and UCLA researchers, specifically to help assist with onboard emergencies.

 

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The robots have a vision system designed to help search for survivors, along with the ability to turn water valves, balance, locate and position fire hoses, and shoot water on fires.

 

"People can only stand relatively short periods of time directly fighting the fire because of the heat, the radiation, the smoke and the steam," said Thomas McKenna, ONR Warfighter Performance Department, in a statement. "A firefighter during a shipboard fire may only be able to be exposed for 15 minutes. The idea is to get around those human limitations."

Continue reading 'US Navy testing seafaring robotic firefighters for use on ships' (full post)

UFO, or most likely a military aircraft, spotted flying over Texas

Well, it looks like the military is having some fun above the skies of Texas, where defense technology blog Ares is reporting on a mysterious, unidentified flying object flying over the skies of Amarillo, Texas, back on March 10.

 

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Bill Sweetman, Aviation Week's defense experts is perplexed, but he is convinced it's real. "Three of us here-myself, Graham Warwick and Guy Norris-concur that the photos show something real. Guy and I have known Steve Douglass for a long time, and know that the reason that he sees (and monitors by radio) unusual things is that he spends time looking for them. Here is Steve's account of one of his better radio intercepts. This is more than a random image.

 

The photos tell us more about what the mysterious stranger isn't than what it is. The size is very hard to determine, for example, although the image size at contrailing height suggests that it is bigger than an X-47B. However, the basic shape-while it resembles Boeing's Blended Wing Body studies or the Swift Killer Bee/Northrop Grumman Bat unmanned air system-is different from anything known to have flown at full size, lacking the notched trailing edge of Northrop Grumman's full-size designs".

Continue reading 'UFO, or most likely a military aircraft, spotted flying over Texas' (full post)

Mayim Bialik: Interest in STEM 'must be nurtured' in high school

Mayim Bialik isn't just a leading cast member of the hit CBS show "The Big Bang Theory," she's also a neuroscientist and strong advocate for helping develop science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) interest in the United States. Bialik plays the role of "Amy Farrah Fowler," a neurobiologist, enjoying her time studying animals as part of her research.

 

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Bialik continues to strengthen her leadership in driving interest in US STEM programs, especially for women trying to break into the field.

 

"Right now, research shows that more than half of high school freshmen who declare interest in STEM-related fields lose interest by the time they graduate," Bialik recently told TweakTown. "For female students, the problem continues into college. One-third of women who enter STEM bachelor's degree programs switch their major to a non-STEM field by the time they graduate,"

 

There has been a large effort to try and generate interest in STEM fields for women, though it has been a continued uphill battle.

 

"Girls' interest in STEM must be nurtured in high school and beyond so it is maintained throughout their education and professional lives. One of the best ways to do that is by introducing them to real-life role models who can show them how to succeed in STEM-related careers. Young women can then envision themselves as part of the STEM fields and develop a sense that STEM offers challenging but realizable opportunities."

Continue reading 'Mayim Bialik: Interest in STEM 'must be nurtured' in high school' (full post)

Google passes on government funding for military robot competition

It's no secret that Google has been swooping in and buying robotic companies left and right, and one of those acquisitions is making headlines today. Schaft Robotics, a company Google bought last year has made it to the finals of a DARPA sponsored robotics competition, and today Google announced that it would not accept funding for the competition that the US government had previously offered.

 

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In a statement released by the DARPA last Friday, the government says that Google has switched to Track D of the program which means it will be fully funding the program from its own bank account, and no government funding will be accepted. The DARPA Robotics Challenge or DRC is a competition that challenges companies to create a robot that can handle disaster zone task such as navigating heavy debris, opening a door, climbing a ladder, and even turning off gas and water valves.

 

Google's Schaft Robot will be competing in the finals which are scheduled to be held some time between December 2014 and June of 2015. Google's other robotics company, Boston Dynamics, will also be competing in the event with its bipedal robot, Petman. This is one competition I would love to watch live, and I hope to get that chance during the next round!

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