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Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 10

NASA: the reality we live in is like 'The Matrix', made by aliens

According to British philosopher Nick Bostrom, the reality that surrounds us is thanks to a highly-advanced computer program, similar to the events of The Matrix.

 

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Dr Bostrom proposed his theory in a paper that he wrote, saying that an evolved race of aliens have "imprisoned the human race" in what Bostrom refers to as "digital imprisonment". You might think he is crazy, but NASA scientist Rich Terrile agrees with Bostrom in a way. Terrile is the director of the Centre for Evolutionary Computation and Automated Design at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

 

Terrile spoke with VICE, where he said: "Right now the fastest NASA supercomputers are cranking away at about double the speed of the human brain. If you make a simple calculation using Moore's Law [which roughly claims computers double in power every two years], you'll find that these supercomputers, inside of a decade, will have the ability to compute an entire human lifetime of 80 years - including every thought ever conceived during that lifetime - in the span of a month".

 

He continued: "In quantum mechanics, particles do not have a definite state unless they're being observed. Many theorists have spent a lot of time trying to figure out how you explain this. One explanation is that we're living within a simulation, seeing what we need to see when we need to see it. What I find inspiring is that, even if we are in a simulation or many orders of magnitude down in levels of simulation, somewhere along the line something escaped the primordial ooze to become us and to result in simulations that made us - and that's cool".

Continue reading 'NASA: the reality we live in is like 'The Matrix', made by aliens' (full post)

MIT researchers developing underwater robots that can think

The use of robots and remote control underwater vehicles are nothing new for ocean exploration, but researchers at MIT want to take things a step further: allow robots to think for themselves, so they can have cognitive capabilities.

 

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Operators are able to program the robots to complete a high-level task, and the underwater robots are able to figure out what they are doing once submerged. It can be a helpful feature so researchers can monitor what is happening below the surface, but the customized craft will be responsible to determine what they should be doing.

 

"We wanted to show that these vehicles could plan their own missions, and execute, adapt, and re-plan them alone, without human support," said Brian Williams, mission planning principal developer at MIT. "We can give the system choices, like, 'Go to either this or that science location and map it out,' or 'communicate via an acoustic modem, or a satellite link."

Bill Nye: Aliens 'gotta exist' somewhere out there

Bill Nye "the Science Guy" believes that aliens are out there somewhere, even though no one is really sure where they will be found. With so many undiscovered galaxies in space, it seems only logical that some form of alien life exists, even if we haven't found one another yet.

 

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"It's gotta exist outside the solar system," Nye recently said while speaking with HuffPost Live. "I mean there's 200 billion stars in this galaxy alone. Then you start talking about the hundreds of billions of galaxies. Hundreds of billions of galaxies, which in turn have hundreds of billions of stars, which in turn have tens of hundreds of billions - trillions - of planets. Come on!"

 

When it comes to the Earth's solar system, Mars and Jupiter's moon of Europa seem like the most likely places to search for alien life. Last year, NASA scientist Kevin Hand said humans would find some form of alien life within the next 20 years, while Nye said that could take up to 30 years.

IBM CEO believes 'our lives will be better' because of AI

IBM CEO Ginni Rometty believes artificial intelligence can be used by humans for our own benefit, despite some outcry that AI poses a threat to mankind. During the World of Watson event, aimed at promoting IBM Watson, Rometty promised a "bold prediction."

 

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"In the future, every decision that mankind makes is going to be informed by a cognitive system like Watson... and our lives will be better for it," Rometty said.

 

IBM Watson is a custom cognitive system that the company promotes as a "new partnership between people and computers that enhances and scales human expertise." The supercomputer has already been used for cancer research - among other breakthrough scientific purposes - but IBM wants to push things even further. Watson was able to beat Jeopardy! king Ken Jennings in 2011, and has been used more recently to help chefs find new recipes.

Continue reading 'IBM CEO believes 'our lives will be better' because of AI' (full post)

The 'Yobot' is able to handle luggage at YOTEL New York hotel

Yotel New York is making use of a customized ABB IRB 6640 robot from MFG Automation, using the custom "Yobot" that handles around 300 pieces of luggage per day. Hotel guests can actually check-in using kiosks, give their luggage to the robot, and go straight to their rooms with minimal worker contact.

 

 

The robot traditionally was designed for an industrial workplace, so it can spot weld or transport manufacturing materials, but the hotel uses it so employees can conduct other tasks.

 

"It also allows our staff to focus on the guest and focus on their needs instead of just the simple task of storing a piece of luggage," said Claes Landberg, general manager of YOTEL New York, in a statement to CNBC.

Continue reading 'The 'Yobot' is able to handle luggage at YOTEL New York hotel' (full post)

Stephen Hawking thinks AI will take over within 100 years

When it comes to artificial intelligence and the way it is advancing, physicist Stephen Hawking is concerned humans could one day lose control. He has spoken out against AI on numerous occasions in the past, and recently shared his thoughts about why humans must be vigilant regarding AI:

 

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"Computers will overtake humans with I at some [time] within the next 100 years," Hawking recently said while speaking at the Zeitgeist 2015 conference. "When that happens, we need to make sure the computers have goals aligned with ours."

 

Even if AI doesn't evolve to become a major threat to mankind, Hawking - and a growing number of major tech and science leaders - want a fair and open discussion regarding AI research. There is major concern over who controls AI, though with self-awareness and learning protocols in place, full artificial intelligence could allow the robots to disregard human operators.

Researchers interested in creating micro-robots, such as RoboBees

Scientists and researchers have great use for robotics development, with a number of different models currently in development. The use of micro-robotics, however, provides an interesting scenario in which researchers study small insects and wildlife for their natural inspiration.

 

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When most people think of robots, they immediately think of large, metallic creations that can be used in factories - but micro-sized robots are proving increasingly popular. If implemented, micro-robots can assist in agriculture, medicine, and other industries, according to supporters.

 

"If you want to make something a centimeter big that can fly, several hundred thousand solutions already exist in nature," said Robert Wood, electrical engineer at Harvard University's Microrobotics Lab, in a statement to National Geographic. "We don't just copy nature. We try to understand the what, how, and why behind an organism's anatomy, movement, and behavior, and then translate that into engineering terms."

Continue reading 'Researchers interested in creating micro-robots, such as RoboBees' (full post)

US military testing new floating seaport that can be located offshore

The US military is interested in testing floating seaports that could be used for large-scale operations, with a test taking place in Hawaii later this month. Using the Montford Point, a 785-foot US Navy vessel as a "mobile landing platform," the hope is to be able to see how realistic personnel and equipment can be transferred to shore.

 

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"In Culebra Koa we'll be expanding to mate different kinds of ships to it," said Lt. Russ Wolfkiel, spokesman for the Expeditionary Strike Group 3, in a statement published by the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. "After (Marines) go in and take the shore, now you've got to move in material to support the war effort, or, in the case of (humanitarian assistance), how do you get that material ashore if your ports are not up to speed?"

 

The exercise will take place starting on May 18, and involve thousands of sailors and US Marines, Air Force and Army personnel. If implemented, using seaports and other sea-basing techniques can make it easier to deliver humanitarian relief and increase security.

Military wants to create better communication between robots, humans

Researchers from the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies (ICT) and US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) are creating new methods for robots and humans to communicate more efficiently.

 

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The multi-modal human-robot dialogue would make use of natural language, but also include text, images and video processing. Ideally, military personnel would be able to more efficiently interact with computers and artificial intelligence, especially during missions when time is critical.

 

"Research and technology are essential for providing the best capabilities to our warfighters," said Dr. Laurel Allender, ARL Human Research and Engineering Directorate director, in a statement. "This is especially so for the immersive and live-training environments we are developing to achieve squad overmatch and to optimize soldier performance, both mentally and physically."

Continue reading 'Military wants to create better communication between robots, humans' (full post)

Tesla has reportedly received $800 million in Powerwall orders so far

When Tesla unveiled its new Powerwall home battery, I don't think most people thought it would take off as fast as it has. According to Bloomberg, Tesla has received over $800 million in orders for the Powerwall and Powerpack batteries so far.

 

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The site says that Tesla has received around $179 million worth of Powerwall reservations so far, with $625 million worth of Powerpack reservations to boot. Tesla has already said that it's taken in around 38,000 total reservations for Powerwall, and 2,500 reservations for Powerpack.

 

Tesla is selling the Powerwall for $3000 and $3500 for the 7kWh and 10kWh models, respectively. Powerpack units make even more money for Tesla, as they're being sold to businesses and utilities for power storage for $250 per kilowatt hour to use.

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