Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,366 Reviews & Articles | 42,362 News Posts

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Science, Space & Robotics Posts - Page 1

US economy will suffer as robots continue to take over the work force

Economists are unsure what to make of robots invading the workforce, with legitimate arguments offered by both sides regarding potential long-term consequences.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43765_01_economy-suffer-robots-continue-take-over-work-force.png

 

The US National Bureau of Economic Research published a report that found as robots are able to continue efficient performance in the workplace, developers are going to eventually cannibalize their own jobs. However, robots still cannot match the precision of humans in many workplace aspects, so it will likely take future hardware and software developments before most jobs are at risk.

 

"When smart machines replace people, they eventually bite the hands of those that finance them," according to the report. "The long run in such cases is no techno-utopia."

Continue reading 'US economy will suffer as robots continue to take over the work force' (full post)

Future wars will likely heavily rely on drones, robots

The use of drones and robotics will be more prevalent in future warfare, providing a great technological edge to a few leading nations. The US and UK might be most recognized as drone leaders, but there are almost 90 different countries using military robotics.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43749_01_future-wars-heavily-rely-drones-robots.jpg

 

When the US began military operations in Iraq more than 10 years ago, there were only a small number of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) available. However, there are now more than 7,000 drones, including aircraft, helicopters, and unmanned ships and other sea-based craft - and the US military wants to purchase even more options.

 

The use of drones also allows for military strikes against targets too dangerous or remote for fighter pilots and ground troops. Faster development of artificial intelligence has some experts worried if robotics and drones may become too smart for mankind's good.

Canadian intelligence accurately identified French Babar malware

The Communication Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) documented a French language cyberespionage piece of malware. Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked the CSEC documents, which were published by the Le Monde French publication and German Der Spiegel newspaper.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43735_01_canadian-intelligence-accurately-identified-french-babar-malware.jpg

 

The sophisticated Babar malware could record and transfer keystrokes and monitor data and audio conversations - it was a well-made, complex piece of software, according to cybersecurity experts. The Remote Access Tool (RAT) was the second piece of software tied to the Snowglobe spyware campaign.

 

"Babar is a highly developed spyware program that could only have been manufactured by very well-trained developers," said Eddy Willems, security evangelist at G DATA Software AG. "Babar is designed to work specifically in networks belonging to companies, authorities, organizations and research institutes and to steal sensitive data from them. As a result, audio conversations such as Skype chats, for example, can be recorded. Even a targeted attack on individual seems conceivable. A mass distribution of such malware, however, is very unlikely."

Continue reading 'Canadian intelligence accurately identified French Babar malware' (full post)

US military testing GuardBot robot ball for surveillance duties

American Unmanned Systems wants to see its amphibious GuardBot used for surveillance missions by the US military, with the unique robot able to travel across land and water. The GuardBot can travel up to 20 miles per hour along the beach and cross water at speeds up to 4 mph, according to American Unmanned Systems.

 

 

The unique robotic ball can vary in sizes, from 10cm up to 9 feet, controllable by one operator or programmable via GPS. The GuardBot was created for non-intrusive surveillance and is extremely quiet as built-in cameras and sensors provide feedback from inside the sealed sphere physical casing. The team is looking to develop software supporting geographic information system data to increase autonomous activity.

 

American Unmanned Systems has a cooperative research development agreement (CRADA) with the US Navy, so they are able to use government research labs and resources to help develop the GuardBot. It was first presented to the military at Marine Corps Base Quantico in 2012, traveling through a volleyball pit - and was shown again in 2014 at the Naval Amphibious Base, deploying and returning to a naval craft.

Continue reading 'US military testing GuardBot robot ball for surveillance duties' (full post)

Ukrainian-Americans helping send drones, other supplies to battlefield

The Ukrainian military wants to use drones in its intensifying military battle against pro-Russian separatists, but has not received much support from NATO countries. Poland will help provide FlyEye mini-UAVs, and current efforts underway rely on private groups to help try to fill the void.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43674_01_ukrainian-americans-helping-send-drones-supplies-battlefield.jpg

 

The Ukrainian government has asked foreign governments for access to drones, but hasn't found many willing participants. The Chicago Automaidan, a pro-Ukrainian group, is now sending Phantom 2 drones for the Ukrainian military to use - which could be used to spy on pro-Russian rebels or aid Ukrainian checkpoints.

 

"Members of the military unit 3002 Ukraine Lviv National Guard would like to thank Chicago Automaidan," as the group continues to supply drones and other military equipment. "We are very grateful to Ukrainians from around the world who are doing everything for our victory."

Poll results show that most Americans wouldn't take a free space trip

It seems that the professionals of the past have lied to us. If 1960's-1980's knowledge is anything to go by, we should be cruising around in flying cars, skating on our hover boards and letting robots serve us gourmet food produced within their metal bellies by now. The disappointment is so strong that popular Australian rapper Seth Sentry even dedicated a song to our apparent lack of Marty McFly technology.

 

 

However, how would you feel if a trip into space was a real thing and free? Monmouth University has just released some poll results, asking members of the public if they would be happy to take a trip up to the stars through a private company offering. This resulted in 69% of the people replying that they would pass up the opportunity.

 

This follows the results that only 17% of polled participants in 1966 would have liked to be the first to step foot on the moon - granted, it was extremely unproven technology in that day-and-age.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43675_014_poll-results-show-americans-take-free-space-trip.png

Farmers hope to use drone flights to help survey land, maximize output

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) recently outlined commercial drone flight rules, but it will take anywhere from 18 months to two years before the rules are official. However, farmers are excited about being able to legally use drones to help with day-to-day farming activities.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43672_01_farmers-hope-use-drone-flights-help-survey-land-maximize-output.jpg

 

"The overall goal is to assist the crop scouts and to see where the [crop] stresses are that they might not even know existed," said Erik Johnson, from the Leading Edge Technologies, in a statement published by the Northfield News. The ability to analyze crop deficiencies and other aspects will greatly speed up the current process, Johnson notes.

 

Agricultural representatives will work with the FAA to discuss possible drone rule exceptions - as some farmers discussed the possibility of nighttime drone flight to help spur extra growth of crops, for example.

These robot tendons are surprisingly effective

Designed to mimic the human hand, this robot device with tendons can rotate two Baoding balls with ease - simulating the same process completed by your body.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43666_02_robot-tendons-surprisingly-effective.gif

 

We're told by Gizmodo that this task isn't exactly easy for just anyone to complete, further adding to the complexity displayed within this exercise. Most robots are clunky and stiff in their movements, however through the use of human-like tendons, this simulation is able to make light work of this difficult and nimble task.

 

Created through an extensive process, first the researchers created a dummy hand, then tracked and measuring six separate hand poses in which were used to rotate the ball, finally designing this tendon system to control the fake hand.

Continue reading 'These robot tendons are surprisingly effective' (full post)

Drone makers, owners benefit from clarified FAA flying rules

Businesses hoping to conduct drone flights as part of their business operations have a bit of clarity after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) released flight guidelines. Guidelines for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) opens the door to the industry and customers, according to a veteran aviation attorney.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43660_01_drone-makers-owners-benefit-clarified-faa-flying-rules.jpg

 

The FAA wants drone operators to continue providing feedback for additional changes along the way - it's still a new and relatively unknown industry for businesses and the government alike. Real estate agents and other companies using hobbyist drones will now be regulated, with manufacturers tasked with discussing regulations to customers.

 

"Regulatory clarity could be a boon to makers and sellers of small UAS, in particular," said Tim Adelman, head of the SeClairRYan practice group. "However, as the industry grows we can expect corresponding growth of FAA enforcement actions. UAS operators should take care to avoid running afoul of the FAA."

Israel expects unmanned vehicles, robots to play bigger military role

The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is embracing unmanned ground vehicles and robots, expecting the newer technologies to have a major role on the battlefield.

 

TweakTown image news/4/3/43624_01_israel-expects-unmanned-vehicles-robots-play-bigger-military-role.jpg

 

G-NIUS Autonomous Unmanned Ground Vehicles is expanding away from the Guardium, promoting the Border Patroller UGV. The ground vehicles will be deployed to patrol the border with Gaza, able to detect and identify insurgent activity - and inform manned patrols.

 

"Its communications systems will be improved [compared to those of the Guardium], and the control aspect will be different," said Maj. Lior Tarbelsi, director of the Robotics Division in the Ground Forces Command's Weapons Department, in a statement published by The Jerusalem Post. "A robot can be risked, and it doesn't have to deal with a lack of lighting. It doesn't have to breathe, and it won't have to worry about getting shot."

Continue reading 'Israel expects unmanned vehicles, robots to play bigger military role' (full post)

Latest News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases
Or Scroll Up Or Down