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Internet & Websites Posts - Page 9

LastPass automatically changes your passwords on hacked websites

LastPass has just released their new feature, allowing the password manager program to automatically change your password on certain websites if they have been hacked or compromised.

 

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To utilize this feature, you will need to log in to your LastPass account, navigate to whichever website you want to setup this new feature for, click Edit and select the "Change Password Automatically" feature. There are approximately 75 websites currently supported by this program with major players including; Facebook, Twitter, Amazon and Home Depot.

 

Once finalized, LastPass automatically changes your passwords for you. This is done by it opening up the browser locally on your screen, logging in and changing the password automatically. There hasn't been any mention on exactly how LastPass gets the hack information delivered directly, but it's a seemingly good precaution to have just in case something goes wrong. Currently supporting Chrome, Safari and Firefox, this automatic feature is featured in Beta format. The point of this program is to manage multiple websites all under one banner, allowing it to quickly and efficiently deal with threats without you having to do it manually step-by-step.

Piratebay servers raided by Swedish police, might be down for good

Some users have noticed that The Pirate Bay has been down for a much longer time than the normal sporadic downtime bursts. At 12 hours, and counting, many have suspected the worst. Google recently moved against apps made for Android devices that accessed the popular site, and many had speculated that Google may have had a hand in The Pirate Bay's disrupted service. It turns out Swedish police are the culprit. The Pirate Bay, deemed "The galaxy's most resilient BitTorrent site", had its apocalyptic safe haven in Sweden raided by the police.

 

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The raid was conducted by Fredrick Ingblad, a specialized inspector in intellectual property crimes. A specialized forensics team and local police seized servers and computers, effectively bringing the popular torrent site to its knees. The Pirate Bay has been under fire for years and the original founders ended up in jail for their efforts. The scrappy site was spread out amongst the wind and managed to continue to thrive for several years, though eventually the website was changed from thepiratebay.org to thepiratebay.se.

Continue reading 'Piratebay servers raided by Swedish police, might be down for good' (full post)

Australia still years behind the rest - ITU announces gigabit copper

We've spoken about it before and I'm sure we'll report on it again - Australia is extremely behind the 'eight ball' when it comes to provision of high-speed internet to its residents. It seems the government is too busy dodging wild crocodiles and drop bears to work on a viable internet solution together.

 

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Just recently, the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) has finalized a new line technology, said to be able to provide broadband service speeds of up to one gigabit per second functional over Australia's old copper phone line network. One gigabit per second sounds really good, so what are we complaining about?

 

There's a few possible issues. The ITU explains that this new G.fast standard has begun shipping to vendors and will be available in the market by December 2015 - meaning we're going to have to put up with our 3 Mbs download and 0.85 Mpbs upload that most Aussie gamers have been living with for the past few years. This technology, said to "combine the best aspects of fibre and DSL" will only provide fibre-like speeds up to 400m away from a distribution point. Setup in a fibre-to-the-distribution-point type structure, this new advancement will see distribution points being laid around various cities, towns and streets. However, they haven't made it clear where or exactly how many of these distribution points will exist.

Continue reading 'Australia still years behind the rest - ITU announces gigabit copper' (full post)

Vimeo now lets you download 4K videos, but you can't stream them

4K is where it's at when it comes to the ultimate in video resolution, with Vimeo standing right on the edge of Ultra HD with its latest announcement.

 

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Vimeo now lets you download 4K videos from its service, for both Vimeo Pro members and Video On Demand providers. The company explains it's still waiting for the technology, to make this technology work, as most people don't have 4K displays at home, yet. The bigger hurdle, are the Internet connections not being fast enough for you to stream 4K video.

 

This is why the company is now letting you download the videos, but not stream them just yet. It's better than nothing though, right?

Google eliminates old reCAPTCHA in favor of noCAPTCHA

Google is migrating away from the old annoyance of reCAPTHCA to a new system they are calling noCAPTCHA. reCAPTCHA relied upon distorted text to filter out robots and abusive scripts, and is widely used as a catch-all for websites to filter out spammers. As the use of robots and abusive scripts increased, they eventually began to decipher the reCAPTCHA distorted text with more accuracy. This led to more intense text distortions in an attempt to thwart these advances. These programs are now able to decipher over 99.8% of all distorted text images, even with the most difficult reCAPTCHA implementations.

 

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Users are simply asked if they are a robot with the noCAPTCHA API, and with one click they can pass the new test. Several sites, such as Snapchat, WordPress, and Humble Bundle, have successfully tested the new noCAPTCHA system. noCAPTCHA relies upon an Advanced Risk Analysis backend that studies a user's activity before, during, and after, the noCAPTCHA challenge. If the system flags the user as a possible script or robot it will issue increasingly difficult challenges and eventually weed out the potential spammer.

Continue reading 'Google eliminates old reCAPTCHA in favor of noCAPTCHA' (full post)

Cox being sued by music labels for failing to handle piracy

Cox Communications are being dragged in front of a court by BMG and Round Hill Music who are alleging that Cox haven't put enough effort into forwarding notices of which demand settlements for copyright violations.

 

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The cable company has apparently gone out of its way to treat these messages as junk mail (spam), with reports claiming that they let 200,000 offenders walk free without warning or prosecution due to their filtering services. The 'Digital Millennium Act' states that networks have a policy for cutting off pirating customers, the aforementioned big labels are claiming that Cox has failed to uphold these terms - which puts them in some rather hot water.

Continue reading 'Cox being sued by music labels for failing to handle piracy' (full post)

Google Play 'Best Apps of 2014' released

Just yesterday, Google has published their brand new 'Best Apps of 2014' list which features some old favorites alongside new big hits.

 

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If you're looking for old favorites; Shazam, Swiftkey Keyboard and TED made the list. These are displayed proudly next to newer offerings such as Over or Strive. It's interesting to see a distinct lack of music service providers missing out of this list, with no Pandora or Spotify listed - however if you're on the path for love, OkCupid has made an appearance quite near to the top of the page.

Continue reading 'Google Play 'Best Apps of 2014' released' (full post)

AOptix pioneering hybrid laser for internet, faster than fiber

A California company has a novel approach to solve problems with delivering fast internet to remote and rural locations. The system can even deliver speeds faster than fiber in locations where laying fiber isn't a financially viable option. Lasers can beam signals up to 10km per jump by utilizing a technology called COR (Composite Optical RF). Each 10km span will merely end up with another repeater, and series of these can deliver up to 2 gigabits per second over amazing distances. This all sounds like the technology of the future, but AOptix Intellimax links are up and running on 5 continents and passing data through diverse weather conditions.

 

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This isn't the first time lasers have been envisioned for backhaul internet applications, but the differentiator is the hybrid nature of the system. Inclement weather, such as rain, dust storms, and other factors, can disrupt laser transmissions. Fog can disrupt millimeter radio as well. The AOptix system also employs millimeter-wave radio in tandem with laser optics. Complex algorithms merge the laser and millimeter wave radio into one cohesive system that essentially provides fault-tolerance in inclement weather.

Continue reading 'AOptix pioneering hybrid laser for internet, faster than fiber' (full post)

More than 3 billion people now browsing the Internet across the world

There are now more than 3 billion people with access to the Internet, as information and communication technology (ICT) growth has increased in almost every country across the world. Internet expansion has increased 6.6 percent year-over-year, as companies continue to expand Web access - especially in developing nations.

 

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"ICTs have the potential to make the world a much better place - in particular for those who are the poorest and the most disenfranchised, including women, youth, and those with disabilities," said Dr. Hamadoun I. Toure, ITU Secretary General, in a statement. "This important report is a critical part of the global ICT development process. Without measurement we cannot track progress, which is why ITU gathers ICT statistics for 200 economies across over 100 indicators."

 

Denmark leads the world in the ITU ICT Development Index, with Korea following in the No. 2 spot.

Continue reading 'More than 3 billion people now browsing the Internet across the world' (full post)

Survey: Most users believe Internet access is a basic human right

A whopping 83 percent of Internet users believe affordable and stable Internet access should be a basic human right, according to the CIGI-Ipsos Global Survey on Internet Security and Trust. More than two-thirds of the world's population don't have Internet access just yet, but there are more campaigns to help people across the world begin to access the Web - largely on mobile devices, such as mobile phones and tablets.

 

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"Overwhelming global public support for the idea that access to the Internet should be a human right also shows just how important the Internet has come to freedom of expression, freedom of association, social communication, the generation of new knowledge, and economic opportunity and growth," said Fen Hampson, director of the CIGI Global Security and Politics Program.

 

"Unless they are brought online, a world of Internet 'have and have-nots' will not only contribute to income inequality, but also stifle the world's full potential for prosperity and innovation."

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