Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,517 Reviews & Articles | 43,775 News Posts

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Hacking & Security Posts - Page 87

Avast support forum hacked, usernames and passwords stolen in breach

Security firm Avast recently suffered a data breach in which its community support forum was hacked, with usernames, email addresses and scrambled passwords of 400,000 forum users now at risk. Avast took the forum offline, and the company will make it mandatory for all returning visitors to immediately reset their passwords.

 

avast_support_forum_hacked_usernames_and_passwords_stolen_in_breach_01

 

It's unknown how the initial breach occurred, though no payment information was stolen - and confirmed it appears to be an isolated incident involving a third-party system.

 

Here is what the company said in a blog post: "We are now rebuilding the forum and moving it to a different software platform. When it returns, it will be faster and more secure. This forum for many years has been hosted on a third-party software platform and how the attacker breached the forum is not yet known. However, we do believe that the attack just occurred and we detected it essentially immediately."

Continue reading 'Avast support forum hacked, usernames and passwords stolen in breach' (full post)

Humana customers at risk, data breach of Unencrypted USB drive

Healthcare provider Humana was recently compromised and up to 3,000 members are at risk following the theft of an encrypted laptop and unencrypted USB flash drive. The company is now informing Atlanta-area customers of the data breach, while providing free credit monitoring to everyone hit by the theft.

 

humana_customers_at_risk_data_breach_of_unencrypted_usb_drive_01

 

The laptop and flash drive were stolen from a Humana associate's vehicle, and names, medical records and Social Security numbers are at risk. Despite the breach, Humana "has no reason to believe that the information has been used inappropriately," though will continue to monitor the situation.

 

It's an unfortunate incident, as company data is often stolen from vehicles or homes of employees - and theft of data stored on an unencrypted flash drives also tends to happen frequently - as companies need to be more diligent in how they try to keep data secure.

'Zberp' malware effectively targeting 450 financial institutions

Cybercriminals utilized code from the infamous Zeus and Carberp pieces of malware software to create the next-generation Zberp threat now targeting customers from 450 international financial institutions, according to researchers from Trusteer.

 

zberp_malware_effectively_targeting_450_financial_institutions_01

 

Zberp is able to track IP addresses and names from infected PCs, capture screen shots and upload them, steal POP3 and FTP credentials, hijack browsing sessions, compromise SSL certificates, and conduct remote desktop connections. Cybercriminals were clever and ensured the registry key would be deleted and rewritten so Zberp is difficult to detect with traditional anti-virus software.

 

"Since the source code of the Carberp Trojan was leaked to the public, we had a theory that it won't take cybercriminals too long to combine the Carberp source code with the Zeus code and create an evil monster," said Trusteer officials in a blog post. "It was only a theory, but a few weeks ago we found samples of the 'Andromeda' botnet that were downloading the hybrid beast."

LulzSec hacker-turned-informant Sabu could get reduced sentence

Infamous former skipper of LulzSec's LulzBoat - Sabu - could escape harsh sentencing for his time spent at the hacktivist group thanks to his "extremely valuable and productive" cooperation with the government.

 

lulzsec_hacker_turned_informant_sabu_could_get_reduced_sentence_01

 

Originally faced with up to 317 months imprisonment, Wired has seen documents from the US Probation Office that show prosecutors are considering a reduced sentence "without regard to the otherwise applicable mandatory minimum" for the case.

 

LulzSec made waves around the web and the world with their brand of irreverent, belligerent hacktivism. But it later emerged that Hector Xavier Monsegur, AKA "Sabu", was turned by the authorities and became an active informant - leading to the arrest of affiliates such as Jeremy Hammond, who was who was recently sentenced to 10 years in prison.

 

The full documents detail the extent of Monsegur's cooperation, which lasted for a number of years. He awaits sentencing 27 May.

eBay didn't originally think user data was compromised in breach

After a major data breach that led eBay to recommend users to update their passwords, company officials didn't think customer data was at risk. However, after customer data was involved, the company moved "swiftly" to ensure customers were secure - though eBay officials also didn't disclose when the breach occurred.

 

ebay_didn_t_originally_think_user_data_was_compromised_in_breach_01

 

"For a very long period of time we did not believe that there was any eBay customer data compromised," said Devin Wenig, eBay global marketplace chief, following news of the breach. "We want to make sure it doesn't happen again so we're going to continue to look (at) our procedures, harden our operational environment and add levels of security where it's appropriate."

 

The data breach has led to multiple investigations, with additional states and countries likely to follow suit, as the No. 1 auction site tries to move forward. The data breach happened after cybercriminals were able to use corporate employee credentials to track down customer data.

Chinese hackers might be banned from attending Def Con

The U.S. federal government might not allow hackers visiting from China into the country to visit the Def Con and Black Hat hacker events, as concerns grow regarding cyberattacks from Chinese sources. The growing political game between both countries has focused on organized cyberattacks - which both sides organize and launch against one another - as cybersecurity becomes even more important.

 

chinese_hackers_might_be_banned_from_attending_def_con_01

 

The idea of trying to ban Chinese citizens from either hacker event hasn't gone over well among event organizers and supporters. The official Def Con website offered this tweet:

 

 

The government has charged five Chinese Army officers with cyberespionage charges, and there is concern of future attacks. U.S. lawmakers are trying to determine how to try to punish China if its organized cyberattacks don't halt - and that seems unlikely to stop anytime soon.

Learning experience following the major eBay breach

After eBay recommended its 145 million users change their passwords, it has become evident: eBay will need to work to recover from what can snowball into a major public relations disaster. The popular auction website has been criticized for being slow to identify the data breach and inform users, months after the initial intrusion took place in February and March.

 

learning_experience_following_the_major_ebay_breach_01

 

"Clear, concise, timely, and regular communications to those impacted by a breach is one of the key critical factors in successfully managing a security incident and in turn rebuilding customers' trust in you," said Brian Honan, CEO of BH consulting, which is a special adviser to Europol. "Something, I'm afraid eBay have failed to do so far."

 

In addition to multiple investigations into the breach, as Target is learning the hard way, eBay's reputation will take a hit among its users. Additional U.S. states and other countries could begin to investigate the breach, with announcements likely in the next few weeks.

Edward Snowden reportedly working for Russian FSB these days

Former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden is working with the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), likely as a technical adviser or consultant, according to Former KGB Maj. Gen Oleg Kalugin. Russia was the first country to offer Snowden asylum, and that likely came at a price, according to the 80-year-old former Russian spy.

 

edward_snowden_reportedly_working_for_russian_fsb_these_days_01

 

"These days, the Russians are very pleased with the gifts Edward Snowden has given them," Kalugin said. "He's busy doing something. He is not just idling his way through life. Whatever he had access to in his former days at NSA, I believe he shared all of it with the Russians, and they are very grateful."

 

U.S. politicians noted earlier in the year that Snowden was likely living "under Russian influence," and there is growing evidence of this now. Instead of welcoming Snowden back to the U.S. to help reduce NSA-related spying and increase U.S. cybersecurity, he's wanted for cybercriminal charges and espionage.

Most data breach victims located in the U.S., Trustwave finds

The United States had 59 percent of cybercrime victims, a whopping lead over the United Kingdom at 14 percent and Australia in third with 11 percent, according to security firm Trustwave. Cybercriminals are making big money with successful data breaches, as customer information and medical records generating lucrative amounts on the black market.

 

most_data_breach_victims_located_in_the_u_s_trustwave_finds_01

 

Retail stores also tend to be attacked the most, with 35 percent of overall attacks investigated by Trustwave during 2013. The food and beverage industry was second with 18 percent and hospitality had just 11 percent of the overall number of attacks. In addition to traditional cyberattacks, retailers need to pay closer attention to sophisticated point-of-sale attacks targeting in-store technologies.

 

"Security is a process that involves foresight, manpower, advanced skillsets, threat intelligence and technologies," noted Robert McCullen, Trustwave CEO, in a press statement. "If businesses are not fully equipped with all of these components, they are only increasing their chances of being the next data breach victim. As we have seen in our investigations, breaches are going to happen. However, the more information businesses can arm themselves with regarding who are their potential attackers, what those criminals are after and how their team will identify, react and remediate a breach if it does occur, is key to protecting their data, users and overall business."

US might be ready for 'retaliatory options' against China cybercrime

The United States wants to make it more politically uncomfortable for China to launch so many cyberattacks, with various retaliatory options on the table if China doesn't better behave with its numerous cyberespionage activities. Earlier in the year, China was blamed as the leading source of cyberattacks, and the attacks are increasingly towards stealing intellectual property - or disrupting critical infrastructure.

 

us_might_be_ready_for_retaliatory_options_against_china_cybercrime_01

 

China has recently talked about improving its own Web security practices, in an effort to defend against U.S. and British spying. The Department of Justice filed charges against several Chinese Army officials, signaling a stronger response to foreign-based cyberattacks:

 

"Criminal charges can justify economic sanctions from our colleagues in the Treasury Department, sanctions that prevent criminals from engaging in financial transactions with U.S. entities and deny access to the U.S. financial system," said John Carlin, Justifice Department national security division head, when discussing the current state of foreign cyberaffairs. "They can facilitate diplomacy by the State Department."

Latest News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases
Subscribe to our Newsletter
Or Scroll Down