TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
5,975 Reviews & Articles | 38,603 News Posts

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Current Affairs Posts - Page 2

Celebrity houses have just been scrubbed from Google Street View

A smattering of household name celebs, like Iraq war mastermind Tony Blair and a man from Wings called Paul McCartney, have had their houses removed from Google's Street View.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38906_01_celebrity_houses_have_just_been_scrubbed_from_google_street_view.jpg

 

Prospective criminals scouting street view for potential targets will now know for certain if they've stumbled on a property of interest because it'll be blurred or digitally altered in a similar way that licence plates and faces already are on the service. One public figure who's had his house altered is Fred Goodwin, the former chief of failed banking group RBS, which had to be nationalized after an enormous crisis.

 

At the moment it's unclear whether or not the alterations have been made at the request of the celebrities. However it comes shortly after the implementation of a controversial EU ruling - the right to be forgotten - which has already led to censorship of reputable international news sites like the BBC and the Guardian, as well as the Mail Online. Barbara Streisand famously tried to force images of her property from the internet, resulting in the naming of a new phenomena - the Streisand Effect - which sees attempts at censorship leading to the exact opposite.

Google's EU right to be forgotten starts censoring UK news

When Europe ruled Google had to enforce the "right to be forgotten" it wasn't entirely clear what that meant, but the first indicators have started. The search giant has been bogged down with search removal requests, and now articles from respected international newspapers are being removed.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38844_01_google_s_eu_right_to_be_forgotten_starts_censoring_uk_news.jpg

 

The Daily Mail, the BBC, and the Guardian have all received notice of removal emails from Google, which asserted that some articles would no longer be listed through search. In these cases, according to the Age, the rulings seem to be siding with a disgraced football referee, Dougie McDonald, and an investment banker, Stan O'Neal, who was involved in the global financial crisis. Guardian media columnist Roy Greenslade has also had some of his articles removed from the listings.

 

Britain's Daily Mail has published a scathing critique of Google's actions, comparing the moves as being similar to "burning books in a library". "These examples show what a nonsense the right to be forgotten is, it is the equivalent of going into libraries and burning books you don't like," MailOnline's publisher Martin Clarke said. "MailOnline intends to regularly publish lists of articles deleted from Google's European search results so people can keep track of what has been deleted. There is no suggestion any of these articles are inaccurate."

Iraq lifts 17 day ban on social media but stays quiet on why

Iraq has lifted a 17 day ban on social media, which was put in place amid a crisis that saw armed militants seize key territories in the country.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38804_01_iraq_lifts_17_day_ban_on_social_media_but_stays_quiet_on_why.jpg

 

The ban was in response to the Islamic State in Iraq and Levant - ISIL - which declared a caliphate over the weekend. Its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, has reportedly been utilizing social media to push out its message.

 

State telecoms company ITPC and the Ministry of Communications are staying quiet on the reasons for lifting the social media ban. But access to some websites are still blocked, including Al Jazeera and Saudi Arabia's TV station, Al Arabiya. Additionally, the Iraq is now also allowing renewed access to VPNs, and mobile data can be used again outside conflict areas, according to Reuters.

Continue reading 'Iraq lifts 17 day ban on social media but stays quiet on why' (full post)

UK privacy chief warns wearables must comply with data law

Britain's privacy regulator has warned that wearable tech must comply with existing privacy laws, in the wake of a Google Glass soft launch in the UK.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38749_01_uk_privacy_chief_warns_wearables_must_comply_with_data_law.jpg

 

Andrew Paterson, senior officer at the Information Commissioner's Office, said in a blog post that there's a danger wearable tech could intrude on the privacy rights of everyday citizens. He asserted that there's a debate to be had surrounding how comfortable the public feels with pervasive wearable devices that are always connected and capable of filming at any time.

 

"If you are using a wearable technology for your own use then you are unlikely to be breaching the [UK Data Protection] Act," Paterson wrote. "This is because the Act includes an exemption for the collection of personal information for domestic purposes. But if you were to one day decide that you'd like to start using this information for other purposes, for example to support a local campaign, then this exemption would no longer apply."

Continue reading 'UK privacy chief warns wearables must comply with data law' (full post)

Dodgy USB charger suspected of killing a woman in Australia

The Australian State of New South Wales' Fair Trading Commissioner, Rod Stowe, has issued a statement to Australian's warning them to not purchase chargers that don't feature the required certification marks, after "the recent death of a consumer where an unapproved USB charger was potentially implicated".

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38732_03_dodgy_usb_charger_suspected_of_killing_a_woman_in_australia.jpg

 

One store in Sydney, New South Wales has had their chargers, travel adapters and power boards removed by the Fair Trading agency. Stowe's warning however, came after "a young woman wearing headphones and holding her laptop was found dead with burns on her ears and chest, in an apparent electrocution". Fair Trading's advice is to not purchase non-standard adapters, informing consumers to make sure the chargers they buy meet standards and have "insulation on the pins of the plug".

 

The agency also tells consumers that "As a general safety rule, consumers should not use any devices while they are plugged in and charging". While this news is from Australia, the warning should apply to all consumers, all across the world.

Julian Assange could make London Fashion Week runway debut this year

Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is going to take a break from releasing classified documents to make his modelling debut for London Fashion Week.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38720_01_julian_assange_could_make_london_fashion_week_runway_debut_this_year.jpg

 

Assange will walk a runway at the Ecuadorian embassy, where he has been granted asylum for the last two years, for Ben Westwood, the son of Dame Vivienne Westwood. It's rumoured that the show will also include celebrity guests like George Clooney and Clooney's lawyer fiancee, who has worked on Assange's defence team.

 

Westwood told the Telegraph that the point is not exactly to launch Assange's career as a model, but to promote him. It won't be a formal event, but more of a "dress up, mill about and have a drink" kind of affair. "The point is to promote Julian Assange," Westwood said.

Continue reading 'Julian Assange could make London Fashion Week runway debut this year' (full post)

Almost half of UK cop calls involve social media complaints

British police are having to spend more and more time investigating abuse online, a chief constable has claimed.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38655_01_almost_half_of_uk_cop_calls_involve_social_media_complaints.jpg

 

Speaking with the BBC, the College of Policing's Alex Marshall said that as people have moved their shopping and communications online, so too have threats, insults and abuse. "I see that it won't be long before pretty much investigation that the police conduct will have an online element to it," Marshall said. He added that a typical day will see a dozen inbound phone calls, and at least half of them will involve "antisocial behavior or abuse or threats of assault" that "may well relate to social media,Facebook, Twitter or other forms."

 

Another officer, Det Con Roger Pegram of the Greater Manchester Police, said that it's not so much the nature of the offences that are changing - just the medium of deliver. "You don't need to actually front someone up face-to-face to threaten them," Pegram said. "This can all be done from the comfort of your own home, a coffee shop with wi-fi, and these people can commit crime anywhere to anybody."

Teens walk up to ATM, get to admin mode with default password

A pair of Winnipeg teenagers were able to "hack" an ATM simply by entering a default administrator passcode.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38375_01_teens_walk_up_to_atm_get_to_admin_mode_with_default_password.jpg

 

Matthew Hewlett and Caleb Turon headed online to look for an operators manual that would tell them how to get into a Safeway ATM. The BMO machine still used the factory default password, and, once in, the two were able to see how much money was in the machine, how many transactions had happened, and other private information.

 

"We thought it would be fun to try it, but we were not expecting it to work," Hewlett told the Winnipeg Sun. "When it did, it asked for a password."

Continue reading 'Teens walk up to ATM, get to admin mode with default password' (full post)

UK plans road reform to allow driverless cars

The United Kingdom is tinkering with its existing laws to allow self-driving cars onto British roads.

 

TweakTown image news/3/8/38361_01_uk_plans_road_reform_to_allow_driverless_cars.jpg

 

MP and transport minister David Willets has apparently been talking with Britain's Department for Transport to make self-driving cars road safe in Britain.

 

The aim is to get British companies designing and building driverless cars - as well as getting roads ready for the upcoming push for the technology.

Continue reading 'UK plans road reform to allow driverless cars' (full post)

Relatives of those missing on MH370 launch whistleblowing reward fund

It has been a very long three months since the Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 went missing, with grieving families of the passengers on-board the plane now offering up $3 million to anyone who will step forward with key information.

 

 

Offering up $3 million for someone to step forward as a whistleblower is quite the step for the families, but with authorities, the Malaysian government and others not coming up with anything, they have run out of things to do. The families are convinced that authorities are covering up the truth of the missing plane, so they've launched a crowd-funding campaign through Indiegogo.

 

The campaign started after Malaysia's acting Transport Minister, Hishammuddin Hussein, bagged Boeing and Rolls Royce for their part in the search for MH370, saying that the responsibility for the entire investigation should fall on Malaysia, Australia and China. Sarah Bajc told The USA Today: "We are taking matters into our own hands. There is no credible evidence that the plane is in the southern Indian Ocean, where planes, boats and a mini-sub have searched in vain for week. I'm convinced that somebody is concealing something".

Continue reading 'Relatives of those missing on MH370 launch whistleblowing reward fund' (full post)

Latest Tech News Posts

View More News Posts
Check out TweakTown Polls on LockerDome on LockerDome

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases