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CPU, APU & Chipsets Posts - Page 25

GlobalFoundries 32nm yield improves, AMD on for 28nm

Everyone knows how GlobalFoundries' 32nm yields started out; its no secret that they were quite poor. AMD even went so far as to go onto record regarding the issue, blaming the poor yields for their lackluster financial performance. The occasional rumor was even heard that AMD may part ways with them at 28nm.

 

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But, the firm is claiming that its 32nm process ramped up quicker than its 45nm process, allowing more than double the amount of wafers to be made during the first five months of production. GlobalFoundries CEO Ajit Manocha acknowledges the initial poor yields, but explains that some operational and organizational changes were made. He hints that these changes will carry over to 28nm.

 

"In just one quarter, we were able to see more than a doubling of yields on 32nm, allowing us to exit 2011 having exceeded our 32nm product shipment requirement," he says. "We are committed to moving ahead on 28nm with GLOBALFOUNDRIES." AMD appears to be happy with GlobalFoundries and they seem to be planning on using them for their 28nm production. Only time will tell if the changes have really helped with 28nm.

We shouldn't see Ivy Bridge-E processors until mid-2013

Sandy Bridge-E owners can breath a sigh of relief, their LGA2011-based CPUs will still be the king of the hill for a while longer now thanks to an X-bit Labs report. Ivy Bridge-E, the hypothetical successor of Sandy Bridge-E, which is an Ivy Bridge take on the LGA2011-HEDT platform, won't see the light of day until 2H of 2013.

 

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It's being reported that we won't see Ivy Bridge-E for quite some time because of Ivy Bridge's delay, which has caused a massive shift in Intel's roadmaps. This will also delay the Haswell-based chips several months to March-June 2013.

 

This all doesn't really mean much, as Intel aren't really being pushed by their competition, AMD, at all. Could this be a sly way of just delaying their products, and polishing them in case AMD do come out with something unexpected? Or are Intel just widening the gap of CPU releases because, well, they can?

IBM's Holey Optochip is capable of 1 terabit per second transfer speeds, holey transfer speeds, Batman!

IBM have reached quite the milestone, with researchers at the company demonstrating a prototype optical chip that is capable of transmitting up to 1 terabit of data per second. Engineers managed to built the Holey Optochip using readily available components, meaning that the chip could actually be manufactured in high volumes for commercial implementation sooner, rather than later.

 

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IBM created the Holey Optochip as part of their continued efforts to use light rather than electronics over wires to transmit huge amounts of data. Surprisingly, the Holey Optochip was created using a standard 90nm-based CMOS chip, which they then drilled 48 tiny holes through the back of it.

 

What this allows is for 24 receiver and 24 transmitter channels, with each capable of moving 20 gigabits of data per second. This results in a product that can move 960 gigabits (nearly 1 terabit) of data per second. For this next bit, I hope you're sitting down: this means you could transfer 30,000 HD movies in 60 seconds. 30,000 in 60 seconds.

Continue reading 'IBM's Holey Optochip is capable of 1 terabit per second transfer speeds, holey transfer speeds, Batman!' (full post)

Intel dumps info on Ivy Bridge processors onto the Internet

Intel have just published publically accessible information all of their upcoming 22nm-built Ivy Bridge processors. This is as official as it gets, before we see the tasty CPUs themselves on the stores of retailers around the world.

 

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Intel has shown something that they call a 'flipbook', which is something that would normally be a printed product guide that would normally be given out to its various partners as a hand-out to let their customers keep track of what all the CPU models are and their specs.

 

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The PDF was posted on one of Intel's partner sites called the Retail Edge Program, and it's not accessible by the general public. But, this is the Internet, and we have tricks and stuff. The specific PDF can be found by simply searching for the various upcoming CPU models. Oh yeah.

Continue reading 'Intel dumps info on Ivy Bridge processors onto the Internet' (full post)

Intel confirms Ivy Bridge delay, can't build a bridge to get over it

Intel have confirmed that their next-generation, 22nm-fabbed Ivy Bridge chips will go on sale eight-to-ten weeks later than they had originally planned, according to Executive Vice-President of Intel, and chairman of Intel China, Sean Maloney.

 

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Maloney talked about the delay in his first interview to discuss Intel's business in China, where he told the Financial Times that the start of sales that sport Ivy Bridge had been pushed back from April, where he says "I think maybe it's June now". First off you "think", Sean? How can you not know this?

 

Maloney said the adjustment was due to problems with the manufacturing process, and also stated that the global launch of the new Intel-powered smartphones would follow the launch of other global launches this year. An Intel-powered Lenovo-based phone would become available in other countries four to five months after it's initial launch in China. Maloney also denied reports that Ivy Bridge was pushed back due to the over-stocked inventories of Sandy Bridge-based notebooks, citing manufacturing process issues.

NVIDIA rebrands again, this time it's Tegra 3's vSMP changed to 4-PLUS-1

NVIDIA's Tegra 3 SoC features four ARM Cortex-A9 chips, but sports a unique design that I covered in an editorial on the chip. NVIDIA have today rebranded the previously-known-as vSMP to: 4-PLUS-1.

 

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It sounds like a polygamy-based wedding invitation, but hey, NVIDIA need to push their unique design somehow, don't they? We should expect to see some Tegra 3-based smartphones next week at the Mobile World Congress, sporting the new brand 4-PLUS-1. NVIDIA have also trademarked the name, which is a bonus.

 

NVIDIA attribute the change in name from vSMP to 4-PLUS-1 to their customers wanting a name that is more "unique and descriptive". They wanted a "name they could put on a box or a store sign that immediately represents its value".

 

From now on, I expect cars to be sold with the slogan: 4-PLUS-1 tires. 4 on the car, 1 spare. Win.

Samsung shows off 32nm quad-core ARM chip

Samsung have teased their latest 32nm quad-core Exynos chip at the ISSCC event, which has been the first example shown of a quad-core Exynos design. The new chip still sports an ARM Cortex-A9, but is now built upon a 32nm process, which provides not only more speed, but better battery life when compared to 2011-era chips.

 

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A new graphics core is featured with four pixel effects processors, and is expected to be around 26-percent faster, even though it uses 34- to 50-percent less power. Just like NVIDIA's Tegra 3 chip, it sports the ability to shut cores off independently to save power, and thus battery life, when a task isn't needed. Samsung's new Exynos chip can support up to dual-channel memory, with either low-power DDR2 or DDR2, to keep the chip working at full speed.

 

Graphics-wise, it's fast enough to render a whopping 57 million polygons per second. Samsung hasn't made made the new quad-core Exynos chip public yet, but the Mobile World Congress is next week where we're sure they'll want to show it off.

Intel Rosepoint is close, sports dual-core Atom with built-in Wi-Fi

Get ready, people. Intel are ready to unveil a breakthrough System-on-a-Chip (SoC), which is said to be a new dual-core Atom-based chip, that sports a digital 2.4GHz Wi-Fi receiver, get this, built into the same die.

 

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This new chip is dubbed "Rosepoint", and is built upon a 32nm architecture and will be shown off for the very first time as a research project at ISSCC 2012 in San Francisco. We should see devices sporting this technology to significantly improve power consumption and produce a more reliable Wi-Fi connection than current analogue-based receivers.

 

Intel Chief Technology Officer, Justin Rattner, says:

 

With a digital approach to radio, you can bring the benefits of Moore's law to RF and radio circuits.

 

In order to achieve this, Intel needed to find a way of stopping the radio waves from interfering with the CPU. Rosepoint steps in and stops this by employing noise-cancelling and radiation-shielding methods to enable the concept to work. At the moment, Rosepoint is just a working prototype, but Intel believes that they can develop the technology into a shipping product by 2015.

AMD have added three new Bulldozer CPUs to Q1 2012 release lineup

AMD have updated their Q1 2012 line-up to include three brand-spankin' new Bulldozer/Zambezi-based chips. This is all from a leaked roadmap that Donanimhaber published, which shows the there new chips as the FX-4150, FX-8140 and FX-6120.

 

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These chips are said to hit anytime between now and April. All of the new chips sport TDPs of just 95W. AMD also have plans to launch quad-core-based Trinity APU models with A10 and A8 processors in the following quarter (Q2), which is said to be followed by A6 and A4 dual-core versions in Q3. I've listed the chip details below:

 

FX-4150:

 

  • Cores: 4
  • Clock speed: 3.9GHz
  • Turbo speed: 4.1GHz
  • Cache: 12MB
  • TDP: 95W

 

FX-6120:

 

  • Cores: 6
  • Clock speed: 3.3GHz
  • Turbo speed: 3.9GHz
  • Cache: 14MB
  • TDP: 95W

 

FX-8140:

 

  • Cores: 8
  • Clock speed: 3.1GHz
  • Turbo speed: 4.0GHz
  • Cache: 16MB
  • TDP: 95W

Intel's Ivy Bridge Core i5 3570K Engineering Sample goes through some testing, impressive results

Intel Engineering Samples, back in my Celeron 300A days, those things were the thing to have. You were pretty hectic to own one of those bad boys and these days, with the likes of eBay's and mainstream (and more accepted) overclocking, it's not as cool, but it still gets my nerd juices flowing.

 

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The latest ES sample comes in the form of Intel's Ivy Bridge-based Core i5-3570K. Henry posted two CPU pictures on the Expreview forums, where we can see the Core i5-3570K is pretty similar to the Core i5-2500K, but it's process has been shrunk to 22nm, clock speeds are up and TDP is down. We have clock speeds of 3.4GHz, and just a 77W TDP.

 

The IGP featured on the Core i5-3570K is Intel HD Graphics 4000, which is stamped into the K-series of processors, as well as some Ivy Bridge processors. HD Graphics reportedly sports 16 EUs, whereas the current HD Graphics 3000-series has 12 EUs.

 

Expreview's article on it goes into some incredible detail with some benchmarks with the 4000-series vs. the 3000-series, but an overall test featuring 3DMark Vantage, Left 4 Dead 2, Street Fighter IV, Starcraft 2, DiRT 3 and Far Cry 2 see the 4000-series come out on top to the tune of 67.25-percent faster. This is not bad, not bad at all, considering it's integrated graphics.

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