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Connectivity & Communications Posts - Page 6

Hybrid memory cube 2.0 capable of 480GB/sec of bandwidth for GPUs

The hybrid memory cube consortium (HMCC) is an organization comprising of memory providers such as Micron Technology, Samsung Electronics, and SK Hynix, is dedicated to developing and establishing an industry-standard interface specification for the hybrid memory cube (HMC) technology.

 

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This week, the consortium unveiled HMC 2.0, which is capable of some truly crazy speeds. HMC 2.0 is capable of supporting bandwidth of 480GB/sec per one memory device. HMC can do this by using advanced through-silicon vias (TSVs) - which are vertical conduits that electrically connect a stack of individual chips - in order to combine high-performance logic with dynamic random access memory (DRAM) die.

 

HMC 1.0 was capable of 160GB/sec of bandwidth, in 2GB density while running 10Gb/s per late data-rate, using up to 70% less energy per bit than existing technologies. The new HMC 2.0 specification supports increased data rate speeds advancing short-reach (SR) performance from 10Gb/s, 12.5Gb/s, 15Gb/s and up to 30Gb/s, allowing the peak bandwidth of a single memory cube to bounce all the way up to 480GB/sec.

Continue reading 'Hybrid memory cube 2.0 capable of 480GB/sec of bandwidth for GPUs' (full post)

Artemis Networks' pCell technology receives support from PureWave

Santa Clara-based PureWave is working with Artemis Networks, which is company behind the impressive pCell Technology that we reported on a few days back now. The two companies are working together on the design and development of base stations for Artemis' pCell technology.

 

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Artemis Networks chose PureWave to supply pWave radios for its upcoming trial deployments, with the test involving the companies using various bands and power levels to wireless carriers who will be using pCell. Dan Picker, PureWave Networks' CEO, said: "PureWave is excited to have partnered with Artemis Networks in helping to realize this promising new pCell technology. It has long been clear to industry veterans that a completely new approach is required to keep up with the exponentially increasing mobile broadband capacity demands of today's users".

 

He continued: "PureWave has focused on Smart-Antenna and Small Cell Base Station technologies to improve the efficiency in which valuable spectral resources are consumed. For this reason, we quickly understood the potential of pCell technology, since it effectively exploits a combination of these techniques. We also knew that our latest generation base station platform would be the perfect complement to realizing the technology in a real-world setting".

Continue reading 'Artemis Networks' pCell technology receives support from PureWave' (full post)

Ericsson and Philips unveil LED streetlights with broadband connectiv

Ericsson and Philips have announced that they are teaming up on a new project that brings green LED lighting to streetlights and helps mobile providers to expand mobile broadband within a city. Ericsson calls the system Zero Site and the idea is to help cities reduce clutter while offering expanded access to broadband around the city.

 

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Philips is providing the green LED streetlights for the plan and the poles used have space inside to support Ericsson cellular networking hardware. Philips says that the city can help offset the costs of installing green LED streetlights by selling or renting the space for networking gear to a wireless provider.

 

The streetlights will help the city reduce electricity usage significantly with a large rollout. Philips says that the lights can provide a power savings of 50 to 70%. Power savings of up to 80% is possible with smart controls according to Philips.

Continue reading 'Ericsson and Philips unveil LED streetlights with broadband connectiv' (full post)

MHL Consortium announces MHL 3.0, 4K streaming and 10W charging

MWC 2014 - The MHL Consortium took the time during Mobile World Congress 2014 to announce it has updated the MHL connectivity specifications. MHL 2.0 has moved to MHL 3.0, which is now capable of streaming 4K content.

 

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MHL 3.0 is also capable of charging devices that run on 5V right up to 2000mA, which means we now have the capability of 10W charging. 10W charging will see tablets and smartphones charging faster than ever, which should put smiles on digital dials. We should see MHL 3.0 being baked into devices as we shift deeper into 2014.

Analogix announces new SlimPort-4K product line

Analogix has just announced the availability of its super-slick new SlimPort-4K line, which provides the ability to share 4K content to external displays and TVs.

 

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The company has leveraged its high-end, ultra-low power SlimPort-4K transmitter, the ANX7816, which is currently in mass production. The SlimPort-4K receiver, the ANX7738, is currently sampling. Andre Bouwer, Vice President of Marketing for Analogix, said: "With SlimPort-4K the video output capabilities of smartphones and tablets surpass that of most mainstream Blu-ray video players. This gives smartphone owners the flexibility to watch movies on their small screen when on the go, or on the big screen when at home and recharging their batteries without compromising video quality".

Ford Sync reportedly switches from Microsoft to BlackBerry

At a time when every major business agreement is a victory, smartphone maker BlackBerry will team up with automaker Ford for its next-generation Sync platform. Ford is working with Microsoft to help provide technology to Sync, but Ford reportedly wants to shake things up a bit.

 

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The BlackBerry QNX platform will be cheaper for Ford to license than Microsoft's technology, and will benefit from increased QNX flexibility. The platform is available in Audi and BMW car models, with QNX used for U.S. military and critical infrastructure efforts.

 

There is a fight to bring technologies into vehicles, with Google partnering with General Motors, Hyundai, Honda and others - and GPU manufacturer NVIDIA also is partnering to offer Android in vehicles. Ford officials not surprisingly didn't confirm the news when contacted by Bloomberg, though shows how serious the auto maker is to improve Sync.

Continue reading 'Ford Sync reportedly switches from Microsoft to BlackBerry' (full post)

Millions of Europeans SMBs, homes will have cellular-connected alarms

The "Internet of Everything" is still nowhere near its full potential, but Europe will embrace the trend with an estimated 5.7 million small businesses and home alarm systems connected to European cellular networks in 2018.

 

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The recent findings were released by Berg Insight in an effort to show how technology is increasing - many automated security services currently make use of self-monitoring, though as more devices are connected, it provides great opportunity for professional monitoring services to be included.

 

"There is considerable growth potential," said Andre Malm, Berg Insight analyst, in a press release.

 

It's not just home- and business-based security alarms that are receiving a strong boost from technological developments that are emerging. There is a great effort to bring connected features into vehicles on the roadway, including enhanced security measures, which can be used to quickly identify - and track - stolen vehicles.

Where can you find the world's fastest 4G? Down Under, mate

According to OpenSignal's State of LTE report for Q1 2014, Australia leads the pack in terms of the fastest LTE/4G speeds in the world. Australia's leading ISP, Telstra, is helping to drive that back home for the country.

 

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The OpenSignal report looks at countries all across the globe, analyzing their 4G networks to see who has the best coverage, speeds and carriers. 17 countries in total were compared, with Italy coming in second place, and in second-to-last, the United States. The average download speed experienced in Australia was 24.5Mbps, while the US trailed behind with just 6.5Mbps.

 

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If we compare the speeds with the last report taken, the US was sitting at 9.6Mbps, and is now reaching an average download speed of 6.5Mbps. Australia on the other hand, has increased from 17.3Mbps to 24.5Mbps.

No more congestion or dead zones for mobiles? Yes thanks, pCell

Steve Perlman, has something that could truly solve some of the problems we have with mobile data congestion, dead zones and more, with his new 'pCell' device.

 

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Current cellular networks use a tower to transmit a radio signal, forming a large cell that provides wireless signal to all mobile devices within that area. This umbrella of signal will feed out whatever you need in terms of data or calls. Cell tower capacity is then shared through mobile devices, taking turns to avoid interfering with each other, and once more people enter the area, speeds can drop.

 

Companies simply can't just add more antennas in order to prepare for the increased demand, as their signals would be disrupted if they're placed too close together. This is where Artemis Networks' pCell technology comes into play, as it enhances the signal itself, with multiple waves combining to form stronger waves.

Continue reading 'No more congestion or dead zones for mobiles? Yes thanks, pCell' (full post)

Connected TVs top 60 percent of households, according to TDG Research

At least 60 percent of households in the United States with broadband Internet access also have at least one connected television, according to information released from The Diffusion Group (TDG) Research. Broadband adoption is slowing due to a mature, stable market, but connected TVs are on the rise, with that trend expected to continue moving forward.

 

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In broadband households with at least one Internet-enabled TV, average ownership totaled 1.6 units, and it's possible that number will increase in 2014.

 

"Whether net-to-TV video will somehow topple traditional pay-TV service models has been a red herring from the beginning," said Michael Greeson, TDG president and director of research, in a press statement. "The real debate is the extent to which the growing availability and expanding use of 'OTT TV' services will have on the time viewers spend watching traditional pay-TV given the growing array of sources at their disposal."

 

The majority of new HDTVs have some type of connected features - so it might not necessarily be consumers showing great interest - as opposed to simply purchasing a new TV that allows Internet access.

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