TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
6,252 Reviews & Articles | 40,834 News Posts

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Business, Financial & Legal Posts - Page 7

Rob Zombie not concerned about online piracy, saying he feels 'freed'

As many musicians and music industry executives are still worried about Internet piracy, longtime artist Rob Zombie isn't overly concerned about the problem. Just a few years ago, Zombie mentioned how piracy could hurt indie bands, not the major artists, but admits he feels "freed" by the current state of the music industry.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41121_01_rob_zombie_not_concerned_about_online_piracy_saying_he_feels_freed.jpg

 

"I don't care about any of that stuff," Zombie recently said. "In fact, in a funny sort of way the fact that nobody buys records doesn't bother me. In fact, I feel like it's freed me. I never did anything to sell records, per se, but when you take that pressure away 100 percent, I swear to God you get more creative because it doesn't matter anymore."

 

Instead, Zombie has a more glass half-full approach: "That's really been the case, I'm happy to give it away for free. I don't care. I just want to make it, play it, get crazy with it. I hear a lot of musicians crying about it but for me, it's re-energized us."

Taylor Swift's record label firing back against Spotify

The battle between online streaming service Spotify and Taylor Swift continues, with the CEO of her Big Machine record label, Scott Borchetta, recently speaking out. Borchetta says Swift has received less than $500,000 in the past 12 months for US Spotify listeners enjoying her music - despite Spotify saying Swift could be paid upwards of $6 million in 2014.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41120_01_taylor_swift_s_record_label_firing_back_against_spotify.jpg

 

It appears Swift's cut will be $2 million for the past 12 months globally, with that number expected to grow as more users sign up for Spotify.

 

Unfortunately, it seems Swift and Borchetta are both forgetting who truly is missing out in this ongoing war of words: the music fans. Millions of Spotify users listened to Swift's music, and while they are no longer able to via Spotify, they are either going to purchase the music, or find an illegal way to download her music.

Ubisoft promises its changing its review policies, but is it too late?

This is my third Ubisoft article for the day, and I'm only just beginning it - the developer has spoken with the BBC, telling the UK news outfit that it will be changing the way it works with game reviews, and gamers themselves.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41108_04_ubisoft_promises_its_changing_its_review_policies_but_is_it_too_late.jpg

 

A spokesperson for Ubisoft told the BBC: "We are working to adapt our services and communications with consumers accordingly, both by changing the way we work with reviewers and by offering customers open betas or other early access to some games, all so that they have the information they need and want". The spokesperson said that the issues are coming from the launch of Assassin's Creed: Unity, where we saw late embargoes for the reviews - most likely to stop the negative press from getting out and affecting the launch, but as my 3-year-old daughter says: "too late".

 

The spokesperson added: "Having the online elements available and having populated world's is essential to creating a representative and complete experience for reviewers. Achieving this prior to launch is incredibly complex, which is why some games are being reviewed much closer - or as was the case with Destiny, even after - the game launches".

Ubisoft stock drops 9FPS, I mean 9% due to Assassin's Creed problems

It seems that my week has been busy with bashing at my keyboard writing up various articles about Ubisoft and Assassin's Creed: Unity, but it's for a good reason: the world needs to know what's going on, and this sh*t needs to stop. Gamers are able to walk away with their hard-earned money, and not purchased the game, but the company's just blame piracy when this happens.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41106_02_ubisoft_stock_drops_9fps_i_mean_9_due_to_assassin_s_creed_problems.png

 

Well, Ubisoft might wake up when their stockholders start to notice sharp drops in their stock prices - with a massive 9% drop in Ubisoft stock after the launch of Assassin's Creed: Unity was met with a truck load of negative reactions and feedback across the world. We can see that the stock was alright up until the morning of Wednesday, 12th of November - and then it dropped harshly, just like the frame rate in Assassin's Creed: Unity.

 

Now we need to see if this will continue, or stabilize and return to norm. Gamers are pissed, and so are people like me, where I don't think Ubisoft should be able to get away with this. Promising something so grand, building Assassin's Creed: Unity from "the ground up" on next-gen consoles, and then launching the game - which was obviously not ready by any means - to gamers, at a very decent premium.

Google ads go down temporarily, publishers lose millions of dollars

Earlier this morning, Google's ad service, Doubleclick, experienced some downtime. During this couple of hours of downtime, Google and publishers across the world would've lost millions upon million of dollars in lost ad revenue.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41082_04_google_ads_go_down_temporarily_publishers_lose_millions_of_dollars.jpg

 

The simple fact is: Google's ad service is an important, and very integral part of the infrastructure of the Internet itself. Most websites, no matter what content they post, rely on Doubleclick for monetizing their content, so when it goes down, it is felt. The outage affected Doubleclick's publishers for around two hours this morning, before Google jumped on the problem and fixed it up back.

 

Google says that all forms of sites were affected, from video, display, native and mobile. The outage is rumored to have even affected YouTube ads and Google's Adsense platform, but there were no further details on what exactly caused it.

NVIDIA slays Samsung in mobile benchmark showdown during patent battle

Most people don't know it, but Samsung and NVIDIA are currently battling it out in the mobile space and in the legal space - with NVIDIA filing a class-action lawsuit against some of the biggest players in the market. Why? Because it says it kinda invented the mobile GPU. Samsung has hit back recently, but NVIDIA was prepared for it.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41085_08_nvidia_slays_samsung_in_mobile_benchmark_showdown_during_patent_battle.jpg

 

Samsung claimed that NVIDIA is falsely advertising its Tegra K1, and that it's not the fastest system-on-chip (SoC) on the block. NVIDIA was more than happy to provide benchmarks that show just how right they are, showing its Tegra K1-powered Shield Tablet, versus Samsung's Exynos 5433 in the above shot.

 

NVIDIA filed the lawsuit against Samsung and Qualcomm a couple of months ago now, claiming the two companies used GPU technology that NVIDIA had created, without providing sufficient compensation. NVIDIA filed its claim with the International Trade Commission and Delaware District Court, but it has taken Samsung these last couple of months to come up with a counter argument. Samsung is now slamming NVIDIA with six alleged patent infringements, as well as hitting another company, Velocity Micro, with eight alleged patent infringements.

Spotify pays billions in royalties, and artists can make millions

Popular music artist Taylor Swift decided to pull her music from streaming service Spotify earlier this month, and now Spotify is firing back. In addition to paying more than $2 billion in music royalties for the right to stream music, Spotify says Swift - and other top artists - "are on track to exceed $6 million a year," with that number expected to double next year.

 

TweakTown image news/4/1/41076_01_spotify_pays_billions_in_royalties_and_artists_can_make_millions.jpg

 

"Lots of problems that have plagued the industry since its inception continue to exist," said Spotify CEO Daniel Ek. "As I said, we've already paid more than $2 billion in royalties to the music industry and if that money is not flowing to the creative community in a timely and transparent way, that's a big problem."

 

When Swift announced she was pulling her music from Spotify, it seemed like a rather curious choice. Ek also said that 80 percent of subscribers started as free users, and a music track that is played more than 500,000 times pays between $3,000 to $4,000 in royalties.

Microsoft's massive $2.5 billion acquisition of Mojang is now complete

Microsoft has officially acquired Mojang, the developer behind Minecraft, for a truly massive $2.5 billion. After announcing the deal in September, all the required paperwork is now done, with the deal now complete.

 

TweakTown image news/4/0/40993_01_microsoft_s_massive_2_5_billion_acquisition_of_mojang_is_now_complete.png

 

Minecraft earned around $326 million in revenue last year across all of its game sales, ports and merchandising. Markus "Notch" Persson, Minecraft's creator and company co-founder, has left the company, as he said he wanted to "go back to doing Ludum Dares and small web experiments".

NVIDIA enjoys record Q3 revenues, with GeForce GPU revenues up 36%

NVIDIA has just posted its Q3 fiscal year 2015 results, which ended on October 26, with some impressive results. The chipmaker has posted a Q3 revenue of $1.23 billion, which is up 16% year-over-year, while revenues are at $3.43 billion, up 15% year-over-year.

 

TweakTown image news/4/0/40987_05_nvidia_enjoys_record_q3_revenues_with_geforce_gpu_revenue_up_36.png

 

The company launched their second-generation Maxwell GPUs in the quarter, with the GeForce GTX 900 series performing, and selling well. NVIDIA's GeForce division also did well, which shouldn't be surprising, with their GPUs being the biggest revenue generator for the company. GPU sales were up 13% year-over-year, and quarter-over-quarter, with GeForce-branded GPU revenue up 36%. Gaming notebook sales are also up, more than double what they were last year. Tesla GPUs and GRID sales were also high, but no exact numbers were released.

 

NVIDIA's Tegra processor sold well over the three-month period, with a 51% increase year-over-year, with Tegra in vehicles being big business for NVIDIA. The company noted that over six million vehicles on the road right now have Tegra-powered infotainment systems. When it comes to mobiles, NVIDIA had quite a few products on the market with their chips: Shield, Google's Nexus 9 and some Chromebooks are powered by the company's Tegra K1 chip.

Qualcomm has shipped 861 million MSM chips this year alone

Qualcomm has unveiled its fourth quarter and fiscal 2014 results, with some huge numbers to show off to the world. GAAP Revenues for the quarter are at $6.69 billion, which is up 3% year-over-year. Income, hit $1.99 billion, up 25% year-over-year, with its net income being $1.89 billion, up 26% year-over-year.

 

TweakTown image news/4/0/40963_06_qualcomm_has_shipped_861_million_msm_chips_this_year_alone.jpg

 

When it comes to GAAP fiscal 2014 results, the 12-month period saw Qualcomm enjoy revenues of $26.49 billion, up 7%. When it came to operating income, Qualcomm made $7.55 billion, up 4% year-over-year, while net income was $7.97 billion, up 16% year-over-year. Operating cash flow for the year was $8.89 billion.

 

Now let's talk chip shipments for the three- and 12-month periods: in Qualcomm's Q4 fiscal 2014, the company shipped 236 million MSM chips, a number that is up 24% year-over-year. Fiscal 2014 numbers are equally as impressive, with 861 million MSM chips shipped in the year, up 20% year-over-year. Total reported device sales for the September quarter through June quarter are quite large: approximately $243.6 billion, a number that is up 5% year-over-year.

Latest News Posts

View More News Posts

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases