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Privacy & Rights Posts - Page 5

NSA has no issues sharing your personal data with Israel

On September 11 of all days, a new leak from Edward Snowden has appeared online thanks to The Guardian, which reports that the NSA shares raw intelligence data with Israel without sifting through it first.

 

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Snowden revealed the startling news, with an intelligence-sharing agreement detailed in a memorandum of understanding between the US spy agency and its Israel counterpart. This has unveiled that the NSA hands over intercepted communications that would contain American citizens' phone call records and e-mails (and most likely much, much more). The agreement between the spy agencies has no legally binding limits on the use of the data by the Israelis.

 

The deal was inked back in March 2009, with the agreement between the US and Israeli spy agencies "pertaining to the protection of US persons" repeatedly stressing the constitutional rights of Americans to privacy, as well as the need for Israeli intelligence staff to 'respect these rights.' The agreement saw the Israeli spy agency with "raw Sigint", which is signal intelligence.

Continue reading 'NSA has no issues sharing your personal data with Israel' (full post)

Germany looks for NSA spy equipment at US consulate

Germany has really been pushing against the United States after the NSA revelations from whistleblower and NSA analyst Edward Snowden. The country has pissed the Americans off by sending a helicopter to look for listening posts at the US consulate in Frankfurt, Germany.

 

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The helicopter flew over the consulate twice, hovering just 60m above the building itself, where German staff took high resolution photos of potential surveillance equipment on the roof. They didn't find any listening posts on its August 28 flight, but Spiegel magazine definitely had something to say: "The message to the American friends was meant to be: 'Stop. Germany strikes back!"

 

Personally, I don't know what the German's were thinking - it's the NSA, they wouldn't just have an iPhone on top of the US consulate listening in on conversations. They'd have terminals within the consulate hacked, or microphones underneath or behind items within the consulate itself.

NSA has hacked into Android, BlackBerry and iPhones, accessed data

Der Spiegel is at it again, reporting that it has NSA documents in its hands that state that the US spy agency accessed data from Apple iPhones, BlackBerry devices and Android-based devices.

 

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Der Spigel stated that most smartphone data can be accessed, including users' contact lists, text message logs and information on geographical locations. The NSA has set up working parties that makes sure each of the main mobile OS' had a "back door" that was accessible to spies. This has stirred memories in Germany, where the paper is based, of the Nazis and the communist era from decades ago.

 

The one company that has the most at stake would be BlackBerry, who has proudly sold devices on the fact that they the encryption in them is too strong for anyone to crack. Google and Apple, we both know have worked with the NSA previously, so this news should come as a shock to no one. This news also comes on the heels of our latest report where we talked about common encryption protocols were nothing for the NSA.

Your common encryption protocols are nothing for the NSA

If you thought your piddly little firewall would protect you, think again: the NSA can get into virtually anything according to a new leak that has popped up on The Guardian and The New York Times.

 

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The leaked documents are from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, who details in the documents that HTTPS and SSL encryption that is used by most e-mail and banking services are nothing to the NSA to break through. The article talks about a ten-year long NSA project that attacks encryption standards from all angles.

 

This method uses server farms for brute-force decryption, using malware to intercept messages before encryption could happen, as well as working from within the walls of the tech industry to make sure the adoption of new protocols take place that would make the NSA's job of spying on the world was easier.

 

You can read more on the scary documents here, and here, but you'll most likely be joined by an NSA analyst somewhere, who is enjoying sharing your screen with you.

Edward Snowden: NSA spied on Al Jazeera communications

German paper Der Spiegel is back, reporting over the weekend that it had looked at a document that NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden provided them with, which stated that the NSA spied on Qatar-based Arab news broadcaster, Al Jazeera.

 

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What makes this news special, is that this is the first time we've had confirmation that the NSA has spied on a media outlet. Spiegel held its cards close to its chest, not posting any of the documents they had, but noted that one of the documents was dated March 23, 2006, showing that "the NSA's Network Analysis Center managed to access and read communication by 'interesting targets' that was specially protected by the news organization. The information also shows that the NSA officials were not satisfied with Al Jazeera's language analysis."

 

Der Spiegel also reported that one of the documents in question said the NSA referred to this operation as a "notable success" because the targets of its operation had "high potential sources of intelligence." You can read all of our Edward Snowden related news here, but be prepared, there's a lot of it.

Microsoft, Google sue government over transparency, ironic, isn't it

I really don't know what to think on this one, but during a blog entry by Microsoft General Counsel & Executive Vice President, Legal & Corporate Affairs Brad Smith, the company said how negotiations with the government over mission "... to publish sufficient data relating to Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) orders" have failed. Microsoft and Google will now continue with litigation to seek permission from the FISA court.

 

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NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has caused quite the tech storm, with most tech companies now asking the government to give them permission to disclose the extent of their cooperation so that customers and foreign governments can make informed decisions about just how trustworthy their services are. We should hear more on this in the coming weeks.

US Government is Facebook's largest requester of user information

Today, Facebook revealed that the US government accounts for the vast majority of the requests for information it receives about its subscribers. The social network said that it was legally required to comply with 79 percent of the 12,000 requests it received from the US government about 21,000 individuals who have profiles on the website.

 

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The US government is not the only guilty party though, as the UK government submitted about 2000 requests on over 2300 Facebook users, which it was obligated to turn over 68 percent of the requests. On the lower-end of the spectrum, Australia requested info on 601 users, of which 64 percent were granted. Facebook chose to release this information in an effort to be transparent after accusations of being close partners with the NSA in the infamous PRISM scandal.

 

In a blog post, Facebook's general counsel, Colin Stretch, wrote: "As we have made clear in recent weeks, we have stringent processes in place to handle all government data requests... We believe this process protects the data of the people who use our service, and requires governments to meet a very high legal bar with each individual request in order to receive any information about any of our users."

German politician wants to stop EU-US trading, blames the NSA

All of this NSA surveillance is really starting to piss people off, with a German political opposition leader wanting to see a complete stop of ongoing European Union and United States trade negotiations until the full breach the NSA has done to the world has been unearthed.

 

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Peer Steinbrück, leader of the Social Democratic (SPD) party, told German public television broadcaster, ARD: "I would interrupt the negotiations until the Americans say if German government offices and European institutions are bugged or wiretapped." Steinbrück added: "We don't know if the Americans may be sitting under our desks with some technical devices."

 

Steinbrück's comments come after it was revealed that the NSA hacked encrypted communications at the United Nations, which we asked "where's the uproar?" because right now, there's none. All before the US steps into another war they can't afford, while spying on the world on the US citizens' tax dollars.

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