TweakTown
Tech content trusted by users in North America and around the world
5,677 Reviews & Articles | 36,088 News Posts
Weekly Giveaway: Fractal Design Arc Cases Contest (Global Entry!)

TweakTown News

Refine News by Category:

Privacy & Rights Posts - Page 2

Target wasn't the only US retailer with data breaches last month

Last month, US retail giant Target was hit with a data breach that saw 40 million customers' private data leaked. The retailer suffered through the threat, and still felt a backlash after it happened - which is expected. In the end, the amount of consumers' data leaked blew out to over 70 million.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34819_08_target_wasn_t_the_only_us_retailer_with_data_breaches_last_month.jpg

 

But what wasn't expected, is Reuters now reporting that it looks like at least three other major US retailers suffered data breaches "using similar techniques" that hit Target. Reuters hasn't unveiled the names of these businesses, but did state they are "well-known US retailers" that do business in shopping malls.

 

Target has since announced its sales have possibly dropped around 2.5% versus the year previous due to the breach, so you can't be surprised if these other companies are holding their cards close to their chest.

Microsoft: No user data taken in Skype breach

Skype user information was not at risk after the Syrian Electronic Army hacker group compromised Skype social media accounts. Microsoft-owned Skype was targeted following leaks from former NSA analyst Edward Snowden, claiming the software company freely gave access so the government could easily snoop on users.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34623_01_microsoft_no_user_data_taken_in_skype_breach.jpg

 

Microsoft confirmed the targeted cyber attack, but said "credentials were quickly reset" before any harm could be done. These types of data breaches are becoming more common, with companies and cyber criminals understanding how important stolen personal information can be.


DROPOUTJEEP - the NSA program that backdoors every iPhone

According to security researcher Jason Appelbaum, and German news magazine Der Spiegel, the NSA has the ability to spy on virtually every iPhone, and users' digital communication sent from said iPhone.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34563_05_dropoutjeep_the_nsa_program_that_backdoors_every_iphone.jpg

 

The NSA reportedly has a program called DROPOUTJEEP, which allows the US spy agency to intercept most things - including SMS messages, contact lists, the physical location of the iPhone (and its user) through cell phone data, and even the ability to access the iPhone's microphone, and camera. Leaked documents have helped put the picture together, with the NSA claiming a 100% success rate when it comes to getting spyware into iOS-based devices.

 

Then comes the scary part: that the NSA requires physical access to the device, which the US spy agency reportedly reroutes shipments of iPhone's purchased online, but it is also working on a remote version, which is even worse. Appelbaum says: "Either [the NSA] have a huge collection of exploits that work against Apple products, meaning they are hoarding information about critical systems that American companies produce, and sabotaging them, or Apple sabotaged it themselves."

 

He finishes with something quite scary: "Do you think Apple helped them with that? I hope Apple will clarify that."

Users more worried about identity theft than privacy

Despite fallout from former IT specialist Edward Snowden, it appears more U.S. voters are interested in security over privacy-related issues. Seventy-five percent of users are worried about personal information theft over 54 percent of those users worried about browsing history being tracked.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34541_05_users_more_worried_about_identity_theft_than_privacy.jpg

 

"By wide margins this survey clearly shows that ID theft has touched the majority of consumers in some way, and that hacking is more worrisome to consumers than tracking, and that voters want the government to more aggressively go after cyber criminals," said Ed Black, CCIA President and CEO, in a statement. "Safeguarding users online must become a higher priority for companies and also for the regulators and policymakers charged with protecting consumers."

 

Even though security is more thought about by U.S. citizens, privacy concerns have caused a major backlash against the National Security Agency (NSA), other US federal branches, and a handful of major corporations.

Google fined $1.2 million for violating Spanish privacy laws

Spain takes its privacy laws pretty serious, and Google has just found out just how serious they consider violations. Today Reuters is reporting that Google has been issued a fine of $1.23 million after it was found guilt of breaking Spain's data protection laws.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34481_1_google_fined_1_2_million_for_violating_spanish_privacy_laws.jpg

 

The fine of $1.23 million is the maximum possible under Spanish law, and this is not the first time that Google has had to pay for a breach of privacy this year. Last month Dutch lawmakers accused Google of breaking the same law in their country.

 

"Inspections have shown that Google compiles personal information through close to one hundred services and products it offers in Spain, without providing in many cases the adequate information about the data that is being gathered, why it is gathered and without obtaining the consent of the owners," said the Spanish Agency for Data Protection.

The NSA went as far as the World of Warcraft to spy on you

New documents have surfaced from Edward Snowden that shows just how far the NSA is willing to go to spy on everyone. The US spy agency along with Brittans GCHQ had agents inside both the World of Warcraft and Secondlife to keep an eye on "targets" who may be using the MMOs to communicate.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34312_1_the_nsa_went_as_far_as_the_world_of_warcraft_to_spy_on_you.jpg

 

The documents state that the NSA thought that the "Unregulated" online gaming worlds would "almost certainly be used as a venue for terrorist laundering and will, with certainty, be used for terrorist propaganda and recruitment." The documents did not state if any arrest were made, or if any terror plots were unveiled as a result of the infiltration.

 

One takedown did result from the spying, but instead of a terrorist organization, a ring of credit card thieves were arrested and their website was shutdown. The spying grew to so many agents that the NSA had to create a "deconflict group" to make sure they were not spying on each other.

NSA spies on virtually every cellphone users' location, everyday

This shouldn't come as a surprise to you, especially if you read TweakTown, as we try to cover the Edward Snowden leaks as they break. Well, the latest news is being reported by The Washington Post, and its a doozy.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34263_04_nsa_spies_on_virtually_every_cellphone_users_location_everyday.jpg

 

The NSA is reportedly taking in users' cellphone data, on a global level, not just within the United States. This equates to around 5 billion records everyday, but don't worry, the NSA says it doesn't have the proper tools to check every single record. Because, you know - we should believe them, right? Well, one of the programs is named Co-Traveler, which allows the US spy agency to determine "behaviorally relevant relationships" based on data from signals intelligence activity designators located around the world. One of which, is named "Stormbrew".

 

Co-Traveler can locate targets purely from cellphone users moving in a group, even if they're unknown threats. Multiple meetups, with the geolocational data, is enough for the NSA's "Co-Traveler" system to notice a pattern.

Researchers use NSA tricks to see just how much data it collects

We know that the NSA's PRISM system scoops up unimaginable amounts of data, so a couple of researchers created an Android app to see just how much metadata is collected from a smartphone, which was compared to basic information on Facebook.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34212_01_researchers_use_nsa_tricks_to_see_just_how_much_data_it_collects.jpg

 

The two Stanford researchers, Jonathan Mayer and Patrick Mutchler, created MetaPhone, using it to see how revealing the metadata was. Mayer told MIT Technology Review: "Some defenders of the NSA's bulk collection programs have taken the position that metadata is not revealing. We want to provide empirical evidence on the issue.... Our hypothesis is that phone metadata is packed with meaning."

 

You can grab MetaPhone yourself, a free app from the Google Play Store, with the app capable of collecting call and text logs, and asks for basic information from Facebook. Early research points to the fact that the metadata definitely includes some juicy data on you, with early results showing that phone metadata can predict whether someone is in a relationship with around 60% accuracy.

Yahoo plans to encrypt all data by the end of Q1 2014

Google is a step ahead of Yahoo here, where it has upgraded all of its SSL certificates to 2048-bit, but now Yahoo is pushing ahead with some hopefully NSA-proof encryption to its information.

 

TweakTown image news/3/4/34013_04_yahoo_plans_to_encrypt_all_data_by_the_end_of_q1_2014.jpg

 

Yahoo CEO, Marissa Mayer, has reiterated the fact that Yahoo has never handed over information from its datacenters to the NSA, or any other government agency for that matter. The CEO said there is nothing more important than users' data and privacy, and that the company is extending the SSL encryption with a 2048-bit key for Yahoo Mail, and all Yahoo products.

 

The 2048-bit goodness should encrypt all Yahoo datacenter information by the end of Q1 2014, so around 4 months from now. From here, it will offer users an option to encrypt all of their data in and out of Yahoo by the end of March next year. The company will also work close with their international Mail partners to make sure that co-branded accounts are also 2048-bit protected.

Edward Snowden took over 200,000 documents according to the NSA

Just how many documents did Edward Snowden take from the NSA? Well, earlier estimates had this pegged at around 50,000... but it looks like the whistleblower took close to 200,000 documents.

 

TweakTown image news/3/3/33927_04_edward_snowden_took_over_200_000_documents_according_to_the_nsa.jpg

 

This is coming directly from NSA General, Keith Alexander, who wished "there was a way to prevent" further leaks, and that information was being out out "in a way that does maximum damage to the NSA and [the United States]." This should mean that Snowden has enough information on him to keep him alive, or at least an asset to Russia.

 

We've seen what has happened to previous whistleblowers, like Bradley Manning and Michael Hastings, but it looks like Snowden has his fair share of information to keep him safe, for now.

Latest Tech News Posts

View More News Posts

Latest Downloads

View More Latest Downloads

TweakTown Web Poll

Question: Did EA kill the Battlefield franchise with the terrible BF4 issues?

Yes, Battlefield is doomed

No, Battlefield will live on strong

I'm not sure, but I know EA needs to improve its game

or View the Results

View More Polls

Forum Activity

View More Forum Posts

Press Releases

View More Press Releases
Get TweakTown updates via Facebook!
Just click the "Like" button below