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Intel to release Tolapai in late 2007- Merged North and South Bridge

| Posted: Feb 13, 2007 11:08 pm

Intel plan to combine the north and south bridges into one chip for their upcoming "Tolapai" chipset, set for release towards the end of this year. This chipset is said to be designed for the embedded system and industrial PC market, rivaling the VIA C7 and AMD Geode platforms.

 

HKEPC have sourced plenty of details on it including several images.

 


Intel scheduled a release of new processor which combined north and south bridge in the same chip for the industry market in late 2007, code named Tolapai, according to friends in the industrial market. Tolapai is designed for embedded system and industrial computer market, against its rival VIA C7 and AMD Geode.

 

Using 65nm manufacturing technology, Tolapa which combined traditional processor, north and south bridge into one single chip is packed in 1088-Ball FCBGA, and its size is only 3.75cm x 3.75cm. As a Pentium M based processor, it could able to be adopted into any IA-32 operation system without any change to drivers and applications. It's saying that Tolapa would be the best and most powerful product for Intel to advance the embedded system and industrial computer market, helping in minimizing the form factor.

 

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