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Intel FSB Overclocking Guide - Intel FSB Overclocking Guide - Page 7

Intel FSB OC

| Guides | Posted: Jul 5, 2001 4:00 am

Intel Pentium III "Coppermine" Processor

 

The Intel Pentium III processor is based on a 0.18 micron process FC-PGA "Coppermine" core which utilizes 100MHz or 133MHz FSB with a core voltage of 1.65v (upto 1.8v for 1.13GHz processors). Being a smaller 0.18 micron process core, the Coppermine cores run much cooler than Pentium III 0.25 micron process cores. This gives FC-PGA processors a much better advantage over bigger 0.25 PPGA Pentium cores. I personally think this is why processors based on the Coppermine core have became so popular in the overclockers market... but that would figure. To fully get the most out of your FC-PGA Intel Pentium IIIE (E = Coppermine 100MHz FSB, EB = Coppermine 133MHz FSB) processor you will need to have a motherboard which supports 133MHz. Meaning it needs to have a ½ AGP clock divider to allow the AGP to run at ½ the FSB. Current chipsets that do not have support for 133MHz only allow for a 1/1 or 2/3 clock divider, which means that a FSB of 133MHz (2/3) would put the AGP at 89MHz, that's 34% above the normal 66MHz. Only some of the best graphics cards can run at this frequency. Many will suffer crashes or lockups and others may not even run at all because of the AGP bus speed being to high for the graphics card to handle.

 

Like all the other processors we have included in this guide, all you need to do to successfully overclock the processor is to up the FSB and make some voltage changes (if needed). In my case, I have a Intel Pentium IIIEB 733MHz processor and Mushkin PC150 memory. If I were to change the FSB from 133MHz to 150MHz, I'd have a 825MHz (5.5x150) frequency. Yes, overclock is generally this simple. This is without allowing for hitches which can sometimes happen. Here is an image of a typical BIOS overclocking section...

 

 

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