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Intel FSB Overclocking Guide - Intel FSB Overclocking Guide - Page 5

Intel FSB OC

| Guides | Posted: Jul 5, 2001 4:00 am

Intel Celeron Processor

 

Most of you will already know that Celeron processors are the most easiest processors to overclock out of all Intel processors. Intel first tests a processor at it's maximum speed. The ones that pass the testing process at this speed are marked and sold as top-of-the-line processors. The processors that fail at the initial maximum speed are tested at lower speeds until they run reliably with no crashes. These slower processor cores are marked with the speed at which they pass the testing process and sold as slower processors. Generally, a processor can be made to run faster then first designed to. Enter the Celeron processor, a processor produced by Intel which had an unusually high capacity for overclocking. When the overclocking world came to know this the Intel Celeron came very popular for low-end users and at first we saw Celeron 266MHz processors being overclocked very easily to 300MHz with active stock cooling.

 

The Intel Celeron was and still is the most overclockable Intel processor on the market. Using PC100 memory you will be able up the FSB from 66MHz to 75MHz, 83MHz or maybe even 100MHz with stock cooling. Say for example you have a Celeron 333 and you change the FSB to 83MHz your processor would now be running at 5x83 = 415MHz. I know when I had my Celeron 333 with a TennMax TF cooler, I could reach 100MHz FSB, but, Windows would boot and crash shortly after. Still, 500MHz (5x100) from a Celeron 333 wasn't bad - this gives you around a 50% overclock. Realistically speaking, you should be able to safely overclock your Intel Celeron to 83MHz FSB with PC100 memory. If you have the choice of buying a Celeron based on 0.25 micron process or a Celeron "Coppermine128" 0.18 micron process go with the second of the two as it runs much cooler than the original PPGA Celeron because of the smaller core size, thus giving you better overclockability.

 

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