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Five Way Performance PSU Roundup - Thermaltake Purepower 480

It wasn't too terribly long ago that the power supply was just another component that had to be bought when it was time to build a new system. But times have changed with the advent of the newer more powerful computers hitting the market. Come join Mike "Darthtanion" Wright as he takes a look at five power supplies and gives some solid answers as to whether it might be just the right one for your own system.

| Other PSUs in Cases, Cooling & PSU | Posted: Jun 25, 2003 4:00 am

Thermaltake Purepower 480

 

 

I'm sure there won't be any problems recognizing this brand name. With their history of creating innovative cooling devices, it was only a matter of time until they waded into the arena of performance components. And though this isn't their first PSU to come to market, it is probably the best looking one to make it.

 

From an aesthetic viewpoint, this particular model is made for their Xaser III line of computer case, but this certainly doesn't mean that it has to be used in this enclosure. But that black side panel on the facing side that would appear through a high window does draw the attention.

 

 

The back panel offers the basics with nothing added in and the power available is ample. We're talking 30A on the 3.3v rail, 40A on the 5v rail and 18A on the 12v rail. If you'll recall, these are the same numbers offered up by the SilenX model, so to repeat the obvious, you'll have plenty of available juice for nearly anything imaginable. And while being rated at 480 watts, it states a peak power output level of 550 watts. And remember, a peak level is a short time (under 60 seconds), so this will cover boot ups where you're close to the maximum power output levels.

 

Connection-wise, we have more Molex than you can shake a stick at. We're talking nine 4-pin Molex connectors, three floppy drive power connectors and a built in Serial ATA connector as well. It also has the supplemental 12v 4-pin power lead, an Auxiliary power lead for Pentium4 boards and a 3-pin connector for the motherboard to monitor fan speeds.

 

Oh, and talking about fans, we've got a pair of the powerful Thermaltake 80mm babies sitting under the hood. But before you think that this will create too much noise, take a look at your control feature:

 

 

Fitting into an empty 5.25" drive bay is a rheostat that allows you full control of the fan speeds of this monster. This allows you to turn the fan speeds down (and hence the decibels) at any moment you choose.

 

What? You don't have an empty 5.25" drive bay handy? You don't like the looks of the front mounted rheostat? That's all right; we're not finished yet...

 

 

If you prefer to use a rear mounted controlling device, there is also included a rheostat built into a PCI plate. Simply replace a PCI blank on the back of your case and you're still able to control the fan speeds and noise levels.

 

Further Reading: Read and find more Cases, Cooling & PSU content at our Cases, Cooling & PSU reviews, guides and articles index page.

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