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Lenovo (Toshiba OEM) THNS128GG4BAAA 128GB Solid State Drive - Benchmarks - Everest Random Access Time

The highest selling SSDs are not always what you might expect. Today we look at one of the most common and least reviewed SSDs on the market.

| SSDs in Storage | Posted: Sep 14, 2010 4:10 pm
Manufacturer: Lenovo

Everest Random Access Time

 

Version and / or Patch Used: 4.60
Developer Homepage: http://www. lavalys.com
Product Homepage: http://www.lavalys.com

 


 

Everest Ultimate and Corporate Edition offer several different benchmarks for testing and optimizing your system or network. The Random Access test is one of very few if not only that will measure hard drives random access times in hundredths of milliseconds as oppose to tens of milliseconds.

 

Drives with only one or two tests displayed in write the write test mean that they have failed the test and their Maximum and possibly their Average Scores were very high after the cached fills. This usually happens only with controllers manufactured by JMicron.

 

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Access times are why solid state technology has such a performance advantage over traditional platter drives. Without the need to move a physical platter into position, SSDs are able to read and write data much faster.

 

In the read test we see the Lenovo OEM drive doing a really good job of keeping access times under .2 ms.

 

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The write access tests were another story entirely. Just like every other JMicron based drive we have ever tested, the Lenovo (Toshiba OEM) drive ran into issues once its buffer was saturated.

 

TweakTown image content/3/5/3516_16.png

 

Here we see the full graph with a nice .38 ms write access time, but then the buffer fills to capacity and sees all hell breaking loose. The maximum recorded time was just over 120ms or 1.2 seconds. If you end up in a situation where you are moving large amounts of data, you may hit a point where the drive appears to lock up. This isn't exactly something you would want to have happen in a workstation environment.

 

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